Astronomy Picture of the Day

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monza
21-12-2009, 15:10
Discover the cosmos! (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2009 December 21
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/0912/30dor_hst.jpg (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/0912/30dor_hst_big.jpg)
Star Cluster R136 Bursts Out
Credit: NASA (http://www.nasa.gov/), ESA (http://www.spacetelescope.org/), & F. Paresce (http://heritage.stsci.edu/2009/32/bio/bio_primary.html) (INAF-IASF (http://www.iasfbo.inaf.it/)), R. O'Connell (http://www.astro.virginia.edu/%7Erwo/) (U. Virginia (http://www.astro.virginia.edu/)), & the HST WFC3 (http://www.stsci.edu/hst/wfc3) Science Oversight Committee Explanation: In the center of star-forming region 30 Doradus (http://www.seds.org/messier/xtra/ngc/n2070.html) lies a huge cluster (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Super_star_cluster) of the largest, hottest, most massive stars known. These stars, known collectively as star cluster R136 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/R136), were captured above in visible light (http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2009/32/image/a/) by the newly installed Wide Field Camera (http://www.stsci.edu/hst/wfc3) peering though the recently refurbished Hubble Space Telescope (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap010806.html). Gas and dust (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap030706.html) clouds in 30 Doradus (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap090916.html), also known as the Tarantula (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tarantula) Nebula, have been sculpted into elongated shapes by powerful winds (http://www-spof.gsfc.nasa.gov/Education/wsolwind.html) and ultraviolet radiation (http://science.hq.nasa.gov/kids/imagers/ems/uv.html) from these hot cluster stars. The 30 Doradus Nebula (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap090331.html) lies within a neighboring galaxy (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xsq1oaehLG4) known as the Large Magellanic Cloud (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap081219.html) and is located a mere 170,000 light-years (http://starchild.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/StarChild/questions/question19.html) away.


Note: An APOD editor will review great space images on 2010 Jan. 14 in Houghton, Michigan. (http://rozsa.mtu.edu/lectures/Nemiroff.php)
Tomorrow's picture: proto orion (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap091222.html)

monza
24-12-2009, 12:53
Discover the cosmos! (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2009 December 22
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/0912/orionproplyds_hst.jpg (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/0912/orionproplyds_hst_big.jpg)
Planetary Systems Now Forming in Orion
Credit: NASA (http://www.nasa.gov/), ESA (http://www.esa.int/), M. Robberto (STScI (http://www.stsci.edu/institute/)/ESA (http://www.esa.int/)), the HST Orion Treasury Project Team (http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005AAS...20714601R), & L. Ricci (http://www.eso.org/%7Elricci/) (ESO (http://www.eso.org/)) Explanation: How do planets form? To help find out, the Hubble Space Telescope (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap090525.html) was tasked to take a detailed look at one of the more interesting of all astronomical nebulae, the Great Nebula in Orion (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap081023.html). The Orion nebula (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap090222.html), visible with the unaided eye (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1vrggYX8H_o) near the belt (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap090210.html) in the constellation of Orion (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orion_%28constellation%29), is an immense nearby starbirth region (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/stellar_nurseries.html) and probably the most famous of all astronomical nebulas. Insets to the above mosaic (http://www.spacetelescope.org/images/html/heic0917ab.html) show numerous proplyds (http://www.spacetelescope.org/news/html/heic0917.html), many of which are stellar nurseries likely harboring planetary systems (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap080218.html) in formation. Some proplyds glow as close disks surrounding bright stars light up, while other proplyd (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proplyd)s contain disks further from their host star, contain cooler dust (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap010813.html), and hence appear as dark silhouettes (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap090516.html) against brighter gas. Studying this dust, in particular, is giving insight for how planets are forming. Many proplyd images also show arcs (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap031115.html) that are shock waves (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Zu5SGllmwc) - fronts where fast moving material encounters slow moving gas. The Orion Nebula (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orion_Nebula) lies about 1,500 light years (http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/cosmic_distance.html) distant and is located in the same spiral arm (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap080711.html) of our Galaxy (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap080713.html) as our Sun (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap090315.html).


Tomorrow's picture: moving target (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap091223.html)

monza
24-12-2009, 12:54
Discover the cosmos! (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2009 December 23
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/0912/SSunriseAyiomamitis_850.jpg (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/0912/SSunriseAyiomamitis_850.jpg)
December Sunrise, Cape Sounion
Credit & Copyright (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/lib/about_apod.html#srapply): Anthony Ayiomamitis (http://www.perseus.gr/) (TWAN (http://www.twanight.org/)) Explanation: The Sun is a moving target (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QmHwyQwn0Sg). Its annual motion (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap081221.html) through planet Earth's sky tracks north and south, from solstice to solstice, as the seasons change (http://www.phy6.org/stargaze/Sseason.htm). On December 21st, the solstice marking (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap081220.html) the first day of winter in the northern hemisphere and summer in the south, the Sun rose at its southernmost point along the eastern horizon. Earlier this month, looking toward the Aegean Sea from a well-chosen vantage point at Cape Sounion (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap080620.html), Greece, it also rose in this dramatic scene (http://www.perseus.gr/Astro-Solar-Scenes-Sounion-03.htm). In the foreground (http://www.stoa.org/metis/cgi-bin/qtvr?site=sounion&node=2&pan=330&tilt=5) lies the twenty-four hundred year old Temple of Poseidon (http://tars.rollins.edu/Foreign_Lang/Greek/sounio.html).


Tomorrow's picture: Gamma Cas and friends (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap091224.html)

monza
24-12-2009, 12:55
Discover the cosmos! (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2009 December 24
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/0912/GammaCass_GregNoel_APOD900.jpg (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/0912/GammaCass_GregNoel_APOD.jpg)
Gamma Cas and Friends
Credit & Copyright (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/lib/about_apod.html#srapply): Processing - Noel Carboni (http://ncarboni.home.att.net/Astrophotography.html), Imaging - Greg Parker, New Forest Observatory (http://www.newforestobservatory.com/about/) Explanation: Gamma Cassiopeiae (http://www.aavso.org/vstar/vsots/1001.shtml) shines high in northern autumn evening skies. The brightest spiky star in this rich and colorful Milky Way starfield, bluish Gamma Cas marks (http://www.absoluteastronomy.com/topics/Gamma_Cassiopeiae) the central peak in the W-shaped constellation Cassiopeia. A hot, variable, and rapidly rotating star (http://stars.astro.illinois.edu/sow/gammacas.html) about 600 light-years distant, Gamma Cas also ionizes surrounding interstellar material (http://www-ssg.sr.unh.edu/ism/what1.html), including the wispy IC 63 (left) and IC 59 emission and reflection (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap091126.html) nebulae. The two faint nebulae are physically close to Gamma Cas (http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005AJ....129..954K), separated from the star by only a few light-years. This well-composed, wide-field view of the region (http://www.newforestobservatory.com/2009/10/31/iom-november-2009-the-gamma-cassiopeia-region-of-cassiopeia/) spans almost 2 degrees on the sky.


Tomorrow's picture: Arc of the Milky Way (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap091225.html)

monza
29-12-2009, 01:58
Discover the cosmos! (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2009 December 25
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/0912/ArcMW_hallas_alt445h.jpg (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/0912/ArcMW_hallas_alt.jpg)
A Graceful Arc
Credit & Copyright (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/lib/about_apod.html#srapply): Tony Hallas (http://astrophoto.com/contact.htm) Explanation: The graceful arc of the Milky Way begins and ends (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap090613.html) at two mountain peaks in this solemn night sky panorama. Created from a 24 frame mosaic, exposures tracking Earth and sky were made separately, with northern California's Mount Lassen at the left and Mount Shasta at the far right, just below the star and dust clouds (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap090925.html) of the galactic center. Lassen and Shasta are volcanoes in the Cascade Mountain Range (http://vulcan.wr.usgs.gov/Volcanoes/Cascades/ImageMaps/CascadeRange/cascade_range.html) of North America, an arc of the volcanic Pacific Ring of Fire. In the dim, snow-capped (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap070203.html) peaks, planet Earth (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap081224.html) seems to echo the subtle glow of the Milky Way's own faint, unresolved starlight (http://www.100hoursofastronomy.org/component/content/article/55-rfienberg/230-qoh-my-god-its-full-of-starsq).


Tomorrow's picture: island universe (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap091226.html)

monza
29-12-2009, 01:59
Discover the cosmos! (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2009 December 26
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/0912/M51HST-Gendler800r.jpg (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/0912/M51HST-GendlerMr.jpg)
M51 Hubble Remix
S. Beckwith (STScI (http://www.stsci.edu/resources/)), Hubble Heritage Team (http://heritage.stsci.edu/commonpages/infoindex/ourproject/moreproject.html), (STScI/AURA (http://www.aura-astronomy.org/)), ESA (http://www.esa.int/), NASA (http://www.nasa.gov/home/index.html)
Additional Processing: Robert Gendler (http://www.robgendlerastropics.com/) Explanation: The 51st entry (http://www.seds.org/messier/m/m051.html) in Charles Messier's famous catalog is perhaps the original spiral nebula (http://www.seds.org/messier/more/m051_rosse.html) - a large galaxy with a well defined spiral structure also cataloged as NGC 5194. Over 60,000 light-years across, M51's spiral arms and dust lanes clearly sweep in front of its companion galaxy (right), NGC 5195 (http://www.seds.org/messier/xtra/ngc/n5195.html). Image data from the Hubble's Advanced Camera for Surveys (http://hubblesite.org/sci.d.tech/nuts_.and._bolts/instruments/acs/) has been reprocessed to produce this alternative (http://www.robgendlerastropics.com/M51HST-Gendler.html) portrait of the well-known (http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2005/12/image/a) interacting galaxy pair. The processing has further sharpened details and enhanced color and contrast in otherwise faint areas, bringing out dust lanes and extended streams that cross the small companion, along with features in the surroundings and core of M51 itself. The pair are (http://www.seds.org/messier/more/m051gr.html) about 31 million light-years distant. Not far on the sky from the handle of the Big Dipper (http://www.astropix.com/HTML/C_SPRING/BIGDIP.HTM), they officially lie within the boundaries of the small constellation Canes Venatici (http://www.allthesky.com/constellations/canesvenatici/).


Tomorrow's picture: Y5B (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap091227.html)

monza
29-12-2009, 02:00
Discover the cosmos! (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2009 December 27
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/0912/catseye3_hst.jpg (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/0912/catseye3_hst_big.jpg)
The Cat's Eye Nebula
Credit: J. P. Harrington (http://www.astro.umd.edu/people/jph.html) (U. Maryland (http://www.astro.umd.edu/)) & K. J. Borkowski (http://www.physics.ncsu.edu/people/faculty_borkowski.html) (NCSU (http://astro.physics.ncsu.edu/)) HST (http://www.stsci.edu/hst/HST_overview/), NASA (http://www.nasa.gov/) Explanation: Three thousand light-years away, a dying star throws off shells of glowing gas. This image (http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/1995/01/image/a/) from the Hubble Space Telescope (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap090525.html) reveals the Cat's Eye Nebula (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cat%27s_Eye_Nebula) to be one of the most complex (http://www.astro.washington.edu/balick/WFPC2/) planetary nebulae (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planetary_nebula) known. In fact (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap990916.html), the features seen in the Cat's Eye (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap070513.html) are so complex that astronomers suspect the bright central object may actually be a binary star system (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap970219.html). The term planetary nebula (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap010805.html), used to describe this general class of objects, is misleading. Although these objects may appear round and planet-like in small telescopes, high resolution images (http://www.noao.edu/jacoby/pn_gallery.html) reveal them to be stars surrounded (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FBw5Do1W4dY) by cocoons of gas blown off in the late stages of stellar evolution (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stellar_evolution).


Tomorrow's picture: barred spiral (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap091228.html)

monza
29-12-2009, 02:00
Discover the cosmos! (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2009 December 28
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/0912/ngc6217_hst.jpg (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/0912/ngc6217_hst_big.jpg)
Barred Spiral Galaxy NGC 6217
Credit: NASA (http://www.nasa.gov/), ESA (http://www.spacetelescope.org/), and the Hubble SM4 ERO Team (http://hubblesite.org/servicing_mission_4/) Explanation: Many spiral galaxies have bars across their centers. Even our own Milky Way Galaxy (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap000130.html) is thought to have a modest central bar (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap050825.html). Prominently barred spiral galaxy NGC 6217, pictured above (http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2009/25/image/bc/), was captured in spectacular detail in this recently released image taken by the newly repaired Advanced Camera for Surveys (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Advanced_Camera_for_Surveys) on the orbiting Hubble Space Telescope (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hubble_Space_Telescope). Visible are dark filamentary dust lanes (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap060219.html), young clusters (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/open_clusters.html) of bright blue stars, red emission nebulas (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/emission_nebulae.html) of glowing hydrogen gas, a long bright bar of stars across the center, and a bright active nucleus (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Active_galactic_nucleus) that likely houses a supermassive black hole (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/htmltest/rjn_bht.html). Light takes about 60 million years to reach us from NGC 6217 (http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001A%26A...376..393P), which spans about 30,000 light years (http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/cosmic_distance.html) across and can be found toward the constellation (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1rnCjUZ4mgA) of the Little Bear (Ursa Minor (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ursa_Minor)).


Note: An APOD editor will review great space images on 2010 Jan. 14 in Houghton, Michigan. (http://rozsa.mtu.edu/lectures/Nemiroff.php)
Tomorrow's picture: witch rigel (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap091229.html)

monza
30-12-2009, 01:52
Discover the cosmos! (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2009 December 29
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/0912/rigelwitch_andreo.jpg (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/0912/rigelwitch_andreo_big.jpg)
Rigel and the Witch Head Nebula
Credit & Copyright: Rogelio Bernal Andreo (http://blog.deepskycolors.com/about.html) (Deep Sky Colors) Explanation: Double, double toil and trouble; Fire burn, and cauldron bubble -- maybe Macbeth (http://the-tech.mit.edu/Shakespeare/macbeth/) should have consulted the Witch Head Nebula. This suggestively shaped reflection nebula (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/reflection_nebulae.html) on the lower left is associated with the bright star Rigel (http://www.astro.uiuc.edu/%7Ekaler/sow/rigel.html), to its right, in the constellation Orion (http://www.astro.uiuc.edu/%7Ekaler/sow/orion-p.html). More formally known as IC 2118 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IC_2118), the Witch Head Nebula glows primarily by light reflected from Rigel (http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-bib_query?bibcode=1997MNRAS.290..521I). Fine dust (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap030706.html) in the nebula reflects the light. Pictured above (http://deepskycolors.com/pics/astro/2009/11/mb_2009-11-16_WitchHead.jpg), the blue color of the Witch Head Nebula and of the dust surrounding Rigel (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c8CgDGhYKe8) is caused not only by Rigel (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rigel)'s blue color but because the dust grains reflect blue light (http://leo.astronomy.cz/mix/mix.html) more efficiently than red. The same physical process (http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/atmos/blusky.html) causes Earth's daytime sky to appear blue (http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/physics/General/BlueSky/blue_sky.html), although the scatterers in Earth's atmosphere (http://csep10.phys.utk.edu/astr161/lect/earth/atmosphere.html) are molecules of nitrogen (http://periodic.lanl.gov/elements/7.html) and oxygen (http://periodic.lanl.gov/elements/8.html). Rigel, the Witch Head Nebula (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap061211.html), and gas and dust that surrounds them lie about 800 light-years (http://starchild.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/StarChild/questions/question19.html) away.


Tomorrow's picture: open space (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap091230.html)

RIDER
30-12-2009, 18:34
<center> Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2009 December 30
http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/0912/m101_spitzer_c800.jpg (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/0912/m101_spitzer.jpg)
</center> <center> Spitzer's M101
NASA (http://www.nasa.gov/), JPL-Caltech (http://spitzer.caltech.edu/), K. Gordon (STScI (http://www.stsci.edu/)) et al. (http://arxiv.org/abs/0804.3223) </center> Explanation: Big, beautiful spiral galaxy M101 is one of the last entries in Charles Messier's (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap000311.html) famous catalog, but definitely not one (http://www.seds.org/messier/m/m102d.html) of the least. About 170,000 light-years across, this galaxy (http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2006/10/) is enormous, almost twice the size of our own Milky Way Galaxy. M101 was also one of the original spiral nebulae (http://www.seds.org/messier/more/m101_rosse.html) observed by Lord Rosse's large 19th century telescope, the Leviathan (http://www.birrcastle.com/telescopeHistory.htm) of Parsontown. Recorded at infrared wavelengths (http://coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu/cosmic_classroom/ir_tutorial/) by the Spitzer Space telescope, this 21st century view (http://www.spitzer.caltech.edu/Media/releases/ssc2008-14/ssc2008-14b.shtml) shows starlight in blue hues while the galaxy's dust clouds are in red. Examining the dust (http://www.spitzer.caltech.edu/Media/releases/ssc2008-14/release.shtml) features in the outer rim of the galaxy, astronomers (http://arxiv.org/abs/0804.3223) have found that organic molecules present throughout the rest of M101 are lacking. The organic molecules tracked by Spitzer's instruments are called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs (http://www.spitzer.caltech.edu/features/articles/20050627.shtml)). Of course, PAHs are common components of dust in the Milky Way (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap080605.html) and on planet Earth are found in soot. PAHs are likely destroyed near the outer edges of M101 by energetic radiation in intense star forming regions. Also known as the Pinwheel Galaxy, M101 (http://www.seds.org/messier/m/m101.html) lies within the boundaries of the northern constellation Ursa Major (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap060317.html), about 25 million light-years away.

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Tomorrow's picture: catching the red-eye

RIDER
31-12-2009, 08:33
Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2009 December 31
http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/0912/helix_spitzer_720.jpg (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/0912/helix_spitzer_2048.jpg)
Dust and the Helix Nebula
NASA (http://www.nasa.gov/home/index.html), JPL-Caltech (http://ssc.spitzer.caltech.edu/), Kate Su (Steward Obs (http://ssc.spitzer.caltech.edu/), U. Arizona) et al. (http://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0702296) Explanation: Dust makes this cosmic eye look red. The eerie Spitzer Space Telescope image (http://www.spitzer.caltech.edu/Media/releases/ssc2007-03/index.shtml) shows infrared (http://coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu//) radiation from the well-studied Helix Nebula (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap060112.html) (NGC 7293) a mere 700 light-years away in the constellation Aquarius (http://www.seds.org/Maps/Stars_en/Fig/aquarius.html). The two light-year diameter shroud of dust and gas around a central white dwarf has long been considered an excellent example of a planetary nebula (http://www.noao.edu/jacoby/pn_gallery.html), representing the final stages in the evolution of a sun-like star. But the Spitzer data show the nebula's central star itself is immersed in a surprisingly bright infrared glow. Models (http://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0702296) suggest the glow is produced by a dust debris disk (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap041210.html). Even though the nebular material was ejected from the star many thousands of years ago, the close-in dust could be generated by collisions in a reservoir of objects analogous to our own solar system's Kuiper Belt (http://www.ifa.hawaii.edu/faculty/jewitt/kb/kb.con.html) or cometary Oort cloud (http://www.windows.ucar.edu/tour/link=/comets/Oort_cloud.html&edu=high). Formed in the distant planetary system, the comet-like bodies would have otherwise survived even the dramatic late stages of the star's evolution (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stellar_evolution).


Tomorrow's picture: new year

RIDER
01-01-2010, 10:39
Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 January 1
http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/NBMoon_StefanoDeRosa_sm.jpg (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/NBMoon_StefanoDeRosa_lg.jpg)
Not a Blue Moon
Credit & Copyright (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/lib/about_apod.html#srapply): Stefano De Rosa (http://ofpink.wordpress.com/) Explanation: This bright Full Moon was captured on December 2nd, shining above a church overlooking the River Po, in Turin, Italy, It was the first Full Moon in (http://aa.usno.navy.mil/data/docs/MoonPhase.php) December. Shining on celebrations of New Year's Eve, last night's Full Moon was the second Full Moon of December and so fits the modern definition of a Blue Moon (http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2009/29dec_bluemoon.htm) - the second Full Moon in a month. Because the lunar cycle (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap070902.html), Full Moon to Full Moon, spans 29.5 days, Blue Moons tend to occur in some month about every 2.5 years. Shining in the glare just above and right of December's first Full Moon is the Pleiades star cluster (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap091014.html).


Tomorrow's picture: star spots

monza
03-01-2010, 00:57
Discover the cosmos! (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 January 2
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/eclipse20091231_Roux900.jpg (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/eclipse20091231_Roux.jpg)
Blue Moon Eclipse
Credit & Copyright (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/lib/about_apod.html#srapply): Jean Paul Roux (%20jpe%20dot%20roux%20at%20orange%20dot%20fr) Explanation: The International Year of Astronomy 2009 (http://www.astronomy2009.org/) ended with a Blue Moon and a partial lunar eclipse (http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/OH/OH2009.html#LE2009Dec31P), as the second Full Moon (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100101.html) of December grazed the Earth's shadow (http://www.shadowandsubstance.com/2009%2012%2031%20partial/2009Dec31partial.htm) on December 31st. The New Year's Eve Blue Moon eclipse (http://spaceweather.com/eclipses/gallery_31dec09.htm) was visible throughout Europe, Asia, Africa and parts of Alaska, captured in this two exposure composite in cloudy skies over Saint Bonnet de Mure, France. Playing (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap060909.html) across the Moon's southern reaches, the edge of Earth's umbra (http://www.perseus.gr/Astro-Eclipses-2009-12-31b.htm), or dark central shadow, appears on the right side along with the prominent ray crater Tycho (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap050305.html). At maximum eclipse, the umbra covered only about 8 percent of the diameter of the lunar disk.



(http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100103.html)

RIDER
03-01-2010, 19:40
Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 January 3
http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/casimirsphere_mohideen.jpg (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/casimirsphere_mohideen_big.gif)
A Force from Empty Space: The Casimir Effect
Credit & Copyright: Umar Mohideen (http://physics.ucr.edu/People/Home/mohideen.html) (U. California at Riverside (http://physics.ucr.edu/)) Explanation: This tiny ball provides evidence that the universe will expand forever. Measuring slightly over one tenth of a millimeter, the ball moves toward a smooth plate (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QaihbfM3C5k) in response to energy fluctuations (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gj8X7VRoxGs) in the vacuum of empty space. The attraction is known as the Casimir Effect (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casimir_effect), named for its discoverer (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hendrik_Casimir), who, 50 years ago, was trying to understand why fluids like mayonnaise (http://recipes.howstuffworks.com/food-facts/question617.htm) move so slowly. Today, evidence is accumulating (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/debate/debate98.html) that most of the energy density in the universe (http://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0703739) is in an unknown form dubbed dark energy (http://www.lbl.gov/Science-Articles/Archive/dark-energy.html). The form and genesis of dark energy (http://xxx.lanl.gov/abs/astro-ph/9811454) is almost completely unknown, but postulated as related to vacuum fluctuations (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/False_vacuum) similar to the Casimir Effect (http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/physics/Quantum/casimir.html) but generated somehow by space itself (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap011202.html). This vast and mysterious dark energy (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dark_energy) appears to gravitationally repel all matter and hence will likely cause the universe to expand forever. Understanding vacuum fluctuations (http://focus.aps.org/v2/st28.html) is on the forefront of research not only to better understand our universe (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap040711.html) but also for stopping micro-mechanical machine parts from sticking together (http://focus.aps.org/v8/st25.html).


Note: An APOD editor will review astronomy images of 2009 (http://www.aaa.org/bonnelllecture10),
hosted by the Amateur Astronomers Association of New York on Friday, January 8 at the American Museum of Natural History, NYC.

Tomorrow's picture: coma halley

monza
05-01-2010, 02:23
Discover the cosmos! (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 January 4
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/halley_giotto.jpg (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/halley_giotto_big.jpg)
Comet Halley's Nucleus: An Orbiting Iceberg
Credit & Copyright: Halley Multicolor Camera Team (http://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/nmc/experimentDisplay.do?id=1985-056A-01), Giotto Project (http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/area/index.cfm?fareaid=15), ESA (http://www.esa.int/) Explanation: What does a comet nucleus look like? Formed from the primordial stuff (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_nebula#Formation_of_planets) of the Solar System, comet nuclei were thought to resemble very dirty icebergs. But ground-based telescopes (http://astro.nineplanets.org/bigeyes.html) revealed only the surrounding cloud of gas and dust of active comets nearing the Sun, clearly resolving only the comet's coma (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap071030.html), and the characteristic cometary tails (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap050522.html). In 1986, however, the European spacecraft Giotto (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giotto_mission) became one of the first group of spacecraft (http://arc.iki.rssi.ru/IPL/vega.html) ever to encounter and photograph the nucleus (http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00002230/) of a comet, passing and imaging Halley's (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halley%27s_Comet) nucleus as it approached the sun. Data from Giotto's camera (http://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/nmc/experimentDisplay.do?id=1985-056A-01) was used to generate this enhanced image (http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=26428) of the potato shaped nucleus that measures roughly 15 kilometers across. Some surface features on the dark (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap050915.html) nucleus (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap040319.html) are on the right, while gas and dust flowing into Halley's coma are on the left. Every 76 years Comet Halley (http://cometography.com/pcomets/001p.html) returns to the inner solar system and each time the nucleus (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap010926.html) sheds about a 6-meter deep layer of its ice and rock into space. This debris shed from Halley's nucleus (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oiRghs0SiR4) eventually disperses into an orbiting trail responsible for the Orionids (http://meteorshowersonline.com/orionids.html) meteor shower (http://www.amsmeteors.org/showers.html), in October of every year, and the Eta Aquariids (http://science.nasa.gov/spaceweather/meteors/etaaquarids/etaaquarids.html) meteor shower every May.


Note: An APOD editor will review astronomy images of 2009 (http://www.aaa.org/bonnelllecture10),
hosted by the Amateur Astronomers Association of New York on Friday, January 8 at the American Museum of Natural History, NYC.


(http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100105.html)

monza
07-01-2010, 01:37
Discover the cosmos! (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 January 5
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/rollcloud_eberl.jpg (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/rollcloud_eberl_big.jpg)
A Roll Cloud Over Uruguay
Credit & Copyright (http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Roll-cloud.JPG): Daniela Mirner Eberl Explanation: What kind of cloud is this? A roll cloud (http://weathersavvy.com/Q-Shelf_Roll_Clouds1.html). These rare long clouds may form near advancing cold fronts. In particular, a downdraft from an advancing storm front can cause moist warm air to rise, cool below its dew point, and so form a cloud (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hKI2Atj08Xk). When this happens uniformly along an extended front, a roll cloud (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roll_cloud) may form. Roll clouds (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap090824.html) may actually have air circulating along the long horizontal axis of the cloud. A roll cloud (http://www.weatherscapes.com/album.php?cat=clouds&subcat=roll_cloud) is not thought to be able to morph into a tornado (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap050613.html). Unlike a similar shelf cloud (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap080122.html), a roll cloud, a type of Arcus cloud (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arcus_cloud), is completely detached from their parent cumulonimbus (http://ww2010.atmos.uiuc.edu/%28Gh%29/guides/mtr/cld/cldtyp/vrt/cb.rxml) cloud. Pictured above (http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Roll-cloud.JPG), a roll cloud (http://epod.usra.edu/blog/2006/04/lovelock-roll-cloud.html) extends far into the distance in 2009 January above Las Olas Beach in Maldonado (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maldonado_Department), Uruguay (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uruguay).


Note: An APOD editor will review astronomy images of 2009 (http://www.aaa.org/bonnelllecture10),
hosted by the Amateur Astronomers Association of New York on Friday, January 8 at the American Museum of Natural History, NYC.


(http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100106.html)

monza
07-01-2010, 01:38
Discover the cosmos! (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 January 6
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/Betel_haubois800.jpg (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/Betel_haubois.jpg)
The Spotty Surface of Betelgeuse
Credit: Xavier Haubois (Observatoire de Paris (http://www.obspm.fr/)) et al. (http://arxiv.org/abs/0910.4167) Explanation: Betelgeuse (http://stars.astro.illinois.edu/sow/betelgeuse.html) really is a big star. If placed at the center of our Solar System it would extend to the orbit of Jupiter. But like all stars except the Sun, Betelgeuse (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap090805.html) is so distant it usually appears as a single point of light, even in large telescopes. Still, astronomers using interferometry (http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/astronomy/interferometry_101.html) at infrared wavelengths can resolve the surface of Betelgeuse and reconstructed this (http://arxiv.org/abs/0910.4167) image of the red supergiant (http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/HBASE/astro/redsup.html). The intriguing picture shows two, large, bright, star spots. The spots potentially represent (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap001222.html) enormous convective cells (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/solar-b/solar_013.html) rising from below the supergiant's surface. They are bright because they're hotter than the rest of the surface, but both spots and surface are cooler than the Sun (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap980829.html). Also known as Alpha Orionis, Betelgeuse is about 600 light-years away.


Note: An APOD editor will review astronomy images of 2009 (http://www.aaa.org/bonnelllecture10),
hosted by the Amateur Astronomers Association of New York on Friday, January 8 at the American Museum of Natural History, NYC.


(http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100107.html)

RIDER
07-01-2010, 07:30
<center> Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 January 7
http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/ssc2010-02b_Sm.jpg (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/ssc2010-02b_Lrg.jpg)
</center> <center> The Tail of the Small Magellanic Cloud
Credit: NASA (http://www.nasa.gov/) / JPL-Caltech / (http://spitzer.caltech.edu/)STScI (http://www.stsci.edu/) </center> Explanation: A satellite galaxy of our Milky Way, the Small Magellanic Cloud (http://spitzer.caltech.edu/news/1042-ssc2010-02-Galaxy-Exposes-its-Dusty-Inner-Workings-in-New-Spitzer-Image) is wonder of the southern sky, named for 16th century Portuguese circumnavigator Ferdinand Magellan (http://www.mariner.org/education/ferdinand-magellan-and-first-circumnavigation-world). Some 200,000 light-years distant in the constellation Tucana, the small irregular galaxy's stars, gas, and dust that lie along a bar and extended "wing", are familiar in images from optical telescopes (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap071001.html). But the galaxy also has a tail. Explored in this (http://spitzer.caltech.edu/images/2878-ssc2010-02b-Little-Galaxy-with-a-Tail) false-color, infrared mosaic from the Spitzer Space Telescope (http://spitzer.caltech.edu/), the tail extends to the right of the more familiar bar and wing. Likely stripped from the galaxy by gravitational tides, the tail contains mostly gas, dust, and newly formed stars (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap091113.html). Two clusters of newly formed stars, warming their surrounding natal dust clouds, are seen in the tail as red spots.


Note: An APOD editor will review astronomy images of 2009 (http://www.aaa.org/bonnelllecture10),
hosted by the Amateur Astronomers Association of New York on Friday, January 8 at the American Museum of Natural History, NYC.
<script type="text/javascript"> digg_url = 'http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100107.html'; digg_skin = 'compact'; </script> <script src="http://digg.com/tools/diggthis.js" type="text/javascript"></script><iframe src="http://digg.com/tools/diggthis.php?u=http%3A//apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100107.html&s=compact&t=Astronomy%20Picture%20of%20the%20Day" width="120" frameborder="0" height="18" scrolling="no"></iframe>
Tomorrow's picture: the fading star mystery

monza
08-01-2010, 13:52
Discover the cosmos! (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 January 8
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/EpsilonAurigae_wong900.jpg (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/EpsilonAurigae_wong.jpg)
The Mystery of the Fading Star
Image Credit & Copyright (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/lib/about_apod.html#srapply): Alson Wong (http://www.alsonwongastro.com/) and Citizen Sky (http://www.citizensky.org/) Explanation: Every 27 years Epsilon Aurigae (http://www.aavso.org/vstar/vsots/eps_aur.shtml) fades, remaining dim for roughly two years before growing bright again. Since the 19th century, astronomers have studied the mystery star, eventually arguing that Epsilon Aur, centered in this telescopic skyview (http://www.alsonwongastro.com/epsilon.htm), was actually undergoing a long eclipse by a dark companion object. But the nature of the companion and even the state of bright star itself could not be pinned down by observations. Continuing to collect evidence, Citizen Sky (http://www.citizensky.org/content/about-citizen-sky), a team of professional and amateur astronomers, is studying the current eclipse of Epsilon Aur, reporting that it began in August 2009 and by late December had reached its deepest point. Epsilon Aur is now expected to remain dim for all of 2010, before rapidly regaining normal brightness in 2011. Meanwhile, recent infrared data (http://spitzer.caltech.edu/images/2866-ssc2010-01a-Epsilon-Aurigae-Puzzle-Pieces-Snap-Into-Place) from the Spitzer Space Telescope supports (http://spitzer.caltech.edu/news/1036-ssc2010-01-Centuries-Old-Star-Mystery-Coming-to-a-Close) a model for the enigmatic system that identifies Epsilon Aur as a large but lower mass star near the end of its life, periodically eclipsed by a single star embedded in a dusty disk (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap041210.html). The disk is estimated to have a radius of about 4 AU (http://neo.jpl.nasa.gov/glossary/au.html), or 4 times the Earth-Sun distance, and to be about 0.5 AU thick.


Note: An APOD editor will review astronomy images of 2009 (http://www.aaa.org/bonnelllecture10),
hosted by the Amateur Astronomers Association of New York tonight at the American Museum of Natural History, NYC.


(http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100109.html)

RIDER
09-01-2010, 11:30
Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 January 9
http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/M31_HALRGBpugh_900.jpg (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/M31_HALRGBpugh.jpg)
Andromeda Island Universe
Credit & Copyright (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/lib/about_apod.html#srapply): Martin Pugh (http://www.martinpughastrophotography.id.au/) Explanation: The most distant object easily visible to the eye is M31 (http://www.seds.org/messier/xtra/history/m-m31_42.html), the great Andromeda Galaxy (http://www.seds.org/messier/m/m031.html) some two and a half million light-years away. But without a telescope, even this immense spiral galaxy - spanning over (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap061228.html) 200,000 light years - appears as a faint, nebulous cloud in the constellation Andromeda (http://www.hawastsoc.org/deepsky/and/index.html). In contrast, details of a bright yellow nucleus and dark winding dust lanes, are revealed in this digital telescopic image (http://www.martinpughastrophotography.id.au/STXBeta.htm). Narrow band image data, recording emission from hydrogen atoms, shows off the reddish star-forming regions (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap091017.html) dotting gorgeous blue spiral arms and young star clusters While even casual skygazers (http://badastronomy.com/bitesize/galaxies.html) are now inspired by the knowledge that there are many (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap070208.html) distant galaxies like M31, astronomers seriously debated (http://adsbit.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-iarticle_query?1995PASP%2E%2E107%2E1133T) this fundamental concept in the 20th century. Were these "spiral nebulae" simply outlying components of our own Milky Way Galaxy or were they instead "island universes" -- distant systems of stars comparable to the Milky Way itself? This question was central to the famous Shapley-Curtis (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/diamond_jubilee/debate20.html) debate (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/diamond_jubilee/debate.html) of 1920, which was later resolved by observations (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap960406.html) of M31 in favor of Andromeda, island universe (http://nedwww.ipac.caltech.edu/level5/March02/Gordon/Gordon2.html).


Note: An APOD editor will review great space images on Thursday, January 14, in Houghton, Michigan. (http://rozsa.mtu.edu/lectures/Nemiroff.php)

Tomorrow's picture: spheres rule

monza
12-01-2010, 02:03
Discover the cosmos! (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 January 10
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/spherule_apollo11.jpg (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/spherule_apollo11_big.jpg)
A Spherule from the Earth's Moon
Credit: Timothy Culler (UCB (http://eps.berkeley.edu/)) et al., Apollo 11 Crew (http://www.hq.nasa.gov/office/pao/History/alsj/a11/a11.crew.html), NASA (http://www.nasa.gov/) Explanation: How did this spherule come to be on the Moon? When a meteorite (http://www.nineplanets.org/meteorites.html) strikes the Moon (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/moon.html), the energy of the impact (http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2001/ast30nov_1.htm) melts some of the splattering rock (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap051002.html), a fraction of which might cool into tiny glass beads (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap010523.html). Many of these glass beads (http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=92383117) were present in lunar soil samples (http://www.lpi.usra.edu/expmoon/Apollo17/A17_sampact.html) returned to Earth by the Apollo missions (http://www.nasm.si.edu/collections/imagery/apollo/apollo.htm). Pictured above (http://www.lbl.gov/Science-Articles/Archive/lunar-spherule.html) is one such glass spherule (http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/spherule) that measures only a quarter of a millimeter (http://lamar.colostate.edu/%7Ehillger/common.html) across. This spherule (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap040210.html) is particularly interesting because it has been victim to an even smaller impact. A miniature crater (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap990711.html) is visible on the upper left, surrounded by a fragmented area caused by the shockwaves of the small impact. By dating (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radiocarbon_dating) many of these impacts (http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080314110406.htm), astronomers can estimate (http://www.lbl.gov/Science-Articles/Archive/lunar-spherule.html) the history of cratering (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap010428.html) on our Moon.


Note: An APOD editor will review great space images this Thursday night in Houghton, Michigan. (http://rozsa.mtu.edu/lectures/Nemiroff.php)

(http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100111.html)

monza
12-01-2010, 02:07
Discover the cosmos! (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 January 11
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/westarcapture_sts51a.jpg (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/westarcapture_sts51a_big.jpg)
The Astronaut Who Captured a Satellite
Credit: STS-51A (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/archives/sts-51A.html), NASA (http://www.nasa.gov/) Explanation: In 1984, high above the Earth's surface, an astronaut captured a satellite. It was the second satellite captured that mission. Pictured above (http://www.nasaimages.org/luna/servlet/detail/NVA2%7E32%7E32%7E65686%7E128547:Space-Shuttle----November-1984), astronaut Dale A. Gardner (http://www.jsc.nasa.gov/Bios/htmlbios/gardner-da.html) flies free (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap090927.html) using the Manned Maneuvering Unit and begins to attach a control device dubbed the Stinger to the rotating Westar 6 satellite. Communications satellite Westar (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Westar) 6 had suffered a rocket malfunction that left it unable to reach its intended high geosynchronous (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geosynchronous_orbit) orbit. Both the previously caught Palapa B-2 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palapa_B2) satellite and the Westar 6 satellite (http://www.fogonazos.es/2009/12/is-this-man-bravest-astronaut-ever.html) were guided into the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle Discovery (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/STS-51-A) and returned to Earth. Westar 6 (http://msl.jpl.nasa.gov/programs/westar.html) was subsequently refurbished and sold (http://images.jsc.nasa.gov/luceneweb/fullimage.jsp?from_month=1&from_day=1&from_year=1900&to_month=12&to_day=31&to_year=3000&datesearch=Go&pageno=989&captionpage=true&photoId=STS51A-104-050&hitsperpage=5).


Note: An APOD editor will review great space images this Thursday night in Houghton, Michigan. (http://rozsa.mtu.edu/lectures/Nemiroff.php)

(http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100112.html)

monza
12-01-2010, 02:07
Sorry double :mecry:

monza
12-01-2010, 17:42
Discover the cosmos! (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 January 12
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/flame_vista.jpg (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/flame_vista_big.jpg)
The Flame Nebula in Infrared
Credit & Copyright (http://www.eso.org/gallery/copyright.html): ESO (http://www.eso.org/)/J. Emerson/VISTA (http://www.vista.ac.uk/); Acknowledgment: Cambridge Astronomical Survey Unit (http://www.ast.cam.ac.uk/%7Emike/casu/) Explanation: What lights up the Flame Nebula? Fifteen hundred light years away towards the constellation of Orion (http://www.astro.wisc.edu/%7Edolan/constellations/constellations/Orion.html) lies a nebula which, from its glow and dark dust (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap990509.html) lanes, appears, on the left, like a billowing fire. But fire (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fire), the rapid acquisition of oxygen (http://periodic.lanl.gov/elements/8.html), is not what makes this Flame (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NGC_2024) glow. Rather the bright star Alnitak (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap061229.html), the easternmost star in the Belt of Orion (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap090929.html) visible just above the nebula, shines energetic light into the Flame (http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1997IAUS..182P..18M) that knocks electrons away from the great clouds of hydrogen (http://www.chemicool.com/elements/hydrogen.html) gas that reside there. Much of the glow results when the electrons (http://www.aip.org/history/electron/) and ionized hydrogen recombine. The above false-color picture (http://www.eso.org/public/images/eso0949a/) of the Flame Nebula (NGC 2024) was taken in infrared (http://www.gemini.edu/public/infrared.html) light, where a young star cluster becomes visible. The Flame Nebula (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap070202.html) is part of the Orion Molecular Cloud Complex (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap090224.html), a star-forming region that includes the famous Horsehead Nebula (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap090721.html), visible above on the far right.


Note: An APOD editor will review great space images this Thursday night in Houghton, Michigan. (http://rozsa.mtu.edu/lectures/Nemiroff.php)

(http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100113.html) (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100113.html)

monza
13-01-2010, 13:07
Discover the cosmos! (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 January 13
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/IC417tsounis900.jpg (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/IC417tsounis.jpg)
The Spider and The Fly
Credit & Copyright (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/lib/about_apod.html#srapply): Troy Tsounis (http://troytsounis.smugmug.com/Photography/CharlotteSkies/) Explanation: Bright clusters and nebulae abound in the ancient northern constellation of Auriga (http://hawastsoc.org/deepsky/aur/index.html). The region includes (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100108.html) the open star cluster M38 (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap030107.html), emission nebula IC 410 (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap060815.html) with Tadpoles (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap060111.html), Auriga's own Flaming Star Nebula IC 405 (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap090126.html), and this interesting pair (http://troytsounis.smugmug.com/Photography/CharlotteSkies/9610939_xQuvy/0/#726700780_zpPxL) IC 417 (lower left) and NGC 1931. An imaginative eye toward the expansive IC 417 (http://www.seds.org/%7Espider/ngc/ngc.cgi?i417) and diminutive NGC 1931 (http://www.seds.org/%7Espider/ngc/ngc.cgi?1931) suggests a cosmic spider and fly (http://poetry.poetryx.com/poems/10524/). About 10,000 light-years distant, both represent young, open star clusters formed in interstellar clouds and still embedded in glowing hydrogen (http://fusedweb.pppl.gov/CPEP/Chart_Pages/5.Plasmas/Nebula/Emission.html) gas. For scale, the more compact NGC 1931 is about 10 light-years across.


Note: An APOD editor will review great space images on Thursday, January 14, in Houghton, Michigan. (http://rozsa.mtu.edu/lectures/Nemiroff.php)


(http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100114.html)

monza
14-01-2010, 13:41
Discover the cosmos! (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 January 14
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/small_gabany_m94.jpg (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/lrg_gabany_m94.jpg)
M94: A New Perspective
Image Credit & Copyright (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/lib/about_apod.html#srapply): R Jay Gabany (http://www.cosmotography.com/index.html) (Blackbird Obs.)
Collaboration: (http://arxiv.org/abs/0907.4884) I. Trujillo, I. Martinez-Valpuesta, D. Martinez-Delgado ( IAC); J. Penarrubia (IoA Cambridge); M. Pohlen (Cardiff) Explanation: Beautiful island universe M94 lies (http://www.seds.org/messier/m/m094.html) a mere 15 million light-years distant in the northern constellation of the hunting dogs, Canes Venatici (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canes_Venatici). A popular target for astronomers the brighter inner part of the face-on spiral galaxy is about 30,000 light-years across. Traditionally, deep images have been interpreted as showing M94's inner spiral region surrounded by a faint, broad ring of stars. But a new multi-wavelength investigation (http://www.cosmotography.com/images/small_new_m94_announcement.html) has revealed previously undetected spiral arms sweeping across (http://www.cosmotography.com/images/M94_disk_animation.html) the outskirts of the galaxy's disk, an outer disk actively engaged in star formation. At optical wavelengths, M94's outer spiral arms are followed in this remarkable discovery image (http://www.cosmotography.com/images/small_new_m94.html), processed to enhance the outer disk structure. Background galaxies are visible through the faint outer arms, while the three spiky foreground stars are in our own Milky Way galaxy.


Note: An APOD editor will review great space images tonight in Houghton, Michigan. (http://rozsa.mtu.edu/lectures/Nemiroff.php)


(http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100115.html)

monza
15-01-2010, 18:14
Discover the cosmos! (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 January 15
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/TwoHemispheresTafreshi_900.jpg (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/TwoHemispheresTafreshi.jpg)
Scenes from Two Hemispheres
Credit & Copyright (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/lib/about_apod.html#srapply): Babak Tafreshi (http://www.twanight.org/tafreshi) (TWAN (http://www.twanight.org/)) Explanation: The stars of a summer (http://www.windows.ucar.edu/tour/link=/the_universe/uts/seasons3.html&edu=high) night on the left and the winter (http://www.windows.ucar.edu/tour/link=/the_universe/uts/seasons3.html&edu=high) night sky on the right are the same stars. In fact, both pictures (http://www.twanight.org/newTWAN/photos.asp?ID=3002339&Sort=All) were taken in late December and have similar fields of view. The left panel shows a scene from a beach on Bruny Island off the coast of Tasmania, Australia (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap070205.html), while the right panel features the sky over the snowy Alborz Mountains (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap070203.html) of northern Iran. But if the sky on one side still looks unfamiliar to you, just put your cursor over the image to see an alternate version. The alternate image will trace the outlines of the familiar constellation of Orion (http://www.gb.nrao.edu/%7Ermaddale/Education/OrionTourCenter/optical.html), as seen from the southern and northern hemispheres of planet Earth (http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/).



(http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100116.html)

monza
16-01-2010, 15:17
Discover the cosmos! (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 January 16
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/C2comet_newSOHOx600.jpg (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/C2comet_newSOHO.jpg)
New Year Sungrazer
Credit: LASCO (http://lasco-www.nrl.navy.mil/), SOHO Consortium (http://sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov/), NRL (http://wwwsolar.nrl.navy.mil/), ESA (http://www.esa.int/), NASA (http://www.nasa.gov/) Explanation: Intense and overwhelming, the direct glare of the Sun is blocked by the smooth occulting disk in this image from the sun-staring SOHO (http://sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov/about/orbit.html) spacecraft. Taken on January 3rd, an extreme ultraviolet image (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap010120.html) of the Sun to scale, is superimposed at the center of the disk. Beyond the disk's outer boundary is a sungrazer comet (http://sungrazer.nrl.navy.mil/index.php?p=sungrazers), one of the brightest yet seen by SOHO (http://sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov/pickoftheweek/old/05jan2010/). The comet was discovered (movie link (http://stereo.gsfc.nasa.gov/img/stereoimages/movies/NYcommet_HI.mov)) by Australian amateur astronomer Alan Watson, while examining earlier images from another sun-watching spacecraft, STEREO-A (http://stereo.gsfc.nasa.gov/). Based on their orbits, sungrazers are believed to belong to the Kreutz family of comets (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kreutz_Sungrazers), created by successive break ups (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap990814.html) from a single large parent comet that passed very near the Sun in the twelfth century. Subjected to strong tidal forces (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tidal_force) and intense solar heat, this sungrazer comet did not survive its close encounter.



(http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100117.html)

monza
18-01-2010, 02:15
Discover the cosmos! (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 January 17
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/0912/atlantis_sts104.jpg (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/0912/atlantis_sts104_big.jpg)
Atlantis to Orbit
Credit: NASA (http://www.nasa.gov/) Explanation: Birds (http://www.pbs.org/lifeofbirds/) don't fly this high. Airplanes (http://quest.arc.nasa.gov/aero/background/) don't go this fast. The Statue of Liberty (http://www.nps.gov/stli/) weighs less. No species (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Species) other than human can even comprehend what is going on, nor could any human (http://www.nlm.nih.gov/research/visible/photos.html) just a millennium ago (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap010101.html). The launch of a rocket (http://www.grc.nasa.gov/WWW/K-12/TRC/Rockets/history_of_rockets.html) bound for space is an event that inspires awe and challenges description. Pictured above (http://science.ksc.nasa.gov/shuttle/missions/sts-104/images/captions/KSC-01PP-1284.html), the Space Shuttle Atlantis (http://science.ksc.nasa.gov/shuttle/resources/orbiters/atlantis.html) lifted off to visit the International Space Station (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap091207.html) during the early morning hours of 2001 July 12. From a standing start, the two million kilogram rocket ship left (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap010219.html) to circle the Earth (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap070325.html) where the outside air is too thin to breathe and where there is little noticeable onboard gravity (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Micro-g_environment). Rockets (http://www.howstuffworks.com/rocket1.htm) bound for space are now launched (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap021023.html) from somewhere on Earth about once a week (http://www.space.com/missionlaunches/launches/launch_schedule.html).



(http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100118.html)

monza
18-01-2010, 16:12
Discover the cosmos! (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 January 18
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/eclipse_kotsiopoulos.jpg (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/eclipse_kotsiopoulos_big.jpg)
Eclipse over the Temple of Poseidon
Credit & Copyright: Chris Kotsiopoulos & Anthony Ayiomamitis (http://www.perseus.gr/) (TWAN (http://www.twanight.org/)) Explanation: What's happened to the Sun? The Moon moved to partly block the Sun for a few minutes last week as a partial solar eclipse became momentarily visible across (http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/OH/OHfigures/OH2010-Fig01.pdf) part of planet Earth. In the above single exposure image (http://www.greeksky.gr/files/photos/sun/20100115Eclypse1.htm), meticulous planning enabled careful photographers to capture the partially eclipsed Sun (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_eclipse) well posed just above the ancient ruins of the Temple of Poseidon (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sounion#Temple_of_Poseidon) in Sounio (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sounion), Greece (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greece). Unexpectedly, clouds covered (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap050411.html) the top of the Sun, while a flying bird was caught in flight just to the right of the eclipse. At its fullest extent from some locations, the Moon was seen to cover the entire middle of the Sun, leaving the surrounding ring of fire (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap090125.html) of an annular solar eclipse (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap051005.html). The next solar eclipse -- a total eclipse of the Sun -- will occur on 2010 July 11 but be visible (http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/OH/OHfigures/OH2010-Fig03.pdf) only from a thin swath of the southern Pacific Ocean (https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/zn.html) and near the very southern tip of South America (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_America).



(http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100119.html)

kemal1923
18-01-2010, 17:17
wonderful image thanks.altough it is believed tht space is limitless but ı read tht mr.a.einsten was about to calculate the boundries of our space.e.g space is not so great as we think.system of mirrors makes us see it so giant.a new .3.5 mtrs.e.s.a telescope maybe prove it .

monza
19-01-2010, 13:56
Discover the cosmos! (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 January 19
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/almosttrees_mro.jpg (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/almosttrees_mro_big.jpg)
Dark Sand Cascades on Mars
Credit: HiRISE (http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/), MRO (http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/mro/), LPL (U. Arizona) (http://www.lpl.arizona.edu/), NASA (http://www.nasa.gov/) Explanation: They might look like trees on Mars, but they're not. Groups of dark brown streaks have been photographed by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (http://mpfwww.jpl.nasa.gov/mro/overview/) on melting pinkish sand dunes covered with light frost. The above image (http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/PSP_007962_2635) was taken in 2008 April near the North Pole (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap021224.html) of Mars. At that time, dark sand (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap060823.html) on the interior of Martian sand dunes (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sand_dune) became more and more visible as the spring Sun (http://www.planetary.org/explore/topics/mars/calendar.html) melted the lighter carbon dioxide ice. When occurring near the top of a dune, dark sand may cascade (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap070805.html) down the dune leaving dark surface streaks (http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/badastronomy/2010/01/11/another-dose-of-martian-awesome/) -- streaks that might appear at first to be tree (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Methuselah_%28tree%29)s standing in front of the lighter regions, but cast no shadows. Objects about 25 centimeters across are resolved on this image (http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/PSP_007962_2635) spanning about one kilometer. Close ups of some parts of this image show billowing plume (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap080311.html)s indicating that the sand slides were occurring even when the image was being taken.



(http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100120.html)

monza
20-01-2010, 14:34
Discover the cosmos! (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 January 20

The Known Universe
Credit & Copyright: American Museum of Natural History (http://www.amnh.org/) Explanation: What would it look like to travel across the known universe? To help humanity visualize this, the American Museum of Natural History (http://www.amnh.org/) has produced a modern movie featuring (http://research.amnh.org/%7Ebro/) many visual highlights of such a trip. The video starts in Earth's Himalayan Mountains (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Himalayas) and then dramatically zooms out, showing the Earth's satellites (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/image_feature_1283.html), the Sun (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap090315.html), the Solar System (http://space.jpl.nasa.gov/), the extent of humanities first radio signals (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Invention_of_radio), the Milky Way Galaxy (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap080606.html), galaxies nearby (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap071211.html), distant galaxies (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap091209.html), and quasars (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quasar). As the distant surface of the microwave background (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microwave_background) is finally reached, radiation (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap031231.html) is depicted that was emitted billions of light years away and less than one million years after the Big Bang. Frequently using the Digital Universe Atlas (http://www.haydenplanetarium.org/universe/download), every object in the video has been rendered to scale given the best scientific research in 2009 (http://www.sciencenews.org/2009/), when the video was produced. The film has similarities to the famous Powers of Ten (http://www.powersof10.com/) video that has been a favorite (http://micro.magnet.fsu.edu/primer/java/scienceopticsu/powersof10/) of many space enthusiasts for a generation.

monza
21-01-2010, 13:54
Discover the cosmos! (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 January 21
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/NGC7770_71_crawford_1rc900.jpg (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/NGC7770_71_crawford.jpg)
Dust and the NGC 7771 Group
Credit & Copyright (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/lib/about_apod.html#srapply): Ken Crawford (http://www.imagingdeepsky.com/Contact.html) (Rancho Del Sol Observatory (http://www.imagingdeepsky.com/)) Explanation: Galaxies of the NGC 7771 Group are featured in this intriguing skyscape (http://www.imagingdeepsky.com/Galaxies/NGC7771/NGC7770_NGC7771.htm). Some 200 million light-years distant toward the constellation Pegasus, NGC 7771 is (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap090829.html) the large, edge-on spiral near center, about 75,000 light-years across, with two smaller galaxies just below it. Large spiral NGC 7769 is seen face-on to the right. Galaxies of the NGC 7771 group are interacting, making repeated close passages (http://burro.cwru.edu/JavaLab/GalCrashWeb/backgrnd.html) that will ultimately result in galaxy-galaxy mergers on a cosmic timescale. The interactions can be traced by galaxy distortions (http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/galaxy/2002/09/) and faint streams of stars (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap080619.html) created by gravitational tides. But a clear view of the galaxy group is difficult to come by, as the deep image also reveals extensive clouds of foreground dust (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap070427.html) sweeping across the field. The dim, dusty nebulae reflect starlight from our own Milky Way Galaxy and lie only a few hundred light-years above the galactic plane (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap090613.html).



(http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100122.html)

monza
25-01-2010, 16:10
Discover the cosmos! (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 January 22
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/aseJan2010_svalgaard800c.jpg (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/aseJan2010_svalgaard.jpg)
Millennium Annular Solar Eclipse
Credit & Copyright (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/lib/about_apod.html#srapply): Mikael Svalgaard (http://www.leif.org/mikael/astro_index.html) Explanation: The Moon's (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap080821.html) shadow raced across planet Earth (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap070610.html) on January 15 (http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/SEmono/ASE2010/ASE2010.html). Observers within the central shadow track were able to witness an annular solar eclipse (http://www.mreclipse.com/Special/SEprimer.html) as the Moon's apparent size was too small to completely cover the Sun. A visually dramatic ring of fire (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap030605.html), the annular phase lasted up to 11 minutes and 8 seconds depending on location, the longest annular solar eclipse for the next 1,000 years (http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/SEcat5/SEcatalog.html). This picture of the Moon's silhouette just before mid-eclipse was taken within the eclipse path from the city of Kanyakumari at the southern tip of India (http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=42311). The telescopic image was made through a filter that blocks most visible light, but still transmits light from hydrogen atoms (http://www.solarobserving.com/halpha.htm). As a result, detailed mottling, or granulation, caused by heat convection in the Sun's (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/solar-b/solar_013.html) atmosphere can be seen around the dark lunar disk.



(http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100123.html)

monza
25-01-2010, 16:11
Discover the cosmos! (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 January 23
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/PalmShadowEclipse_heinsius900.jpg (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/PalmShadowEclipse_heinsius.jpg)
Eclipses in the Shade
Credit & Copyright (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/lib/about_apod.html#srapply): Stephan Heinsius (http://www.stephan-heinsius.de/) Explanation: Eclipses are everywhere in this shady scene. The picture was taken (http://www.eclipseland.com/page,malediven_2010_ringfrmig,10056.html) on the Indian Ocean atoll island of Ellaidhoo, Maldives, on January 15, during the longest annular solar eclipse (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100122.html) for the next 1,000 years. Tall palm trees provided the shade. Their many crossed leaves created gaps that acted like pinhole (http://www.pinhole.cz/en/pinholecameras/whatis.html) cameras, scattering recognizable eclipse images (http://www.spaceweather.com/eclipses/gallery_15jan10.htm) across the white sands of a tropical garden near the beach. From this idyllic location near the centerline of the Moon's shadow track (http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/SEgoogle/SEgoogle2001/SE2010Jan15Agoogle2.html), the ring of fire or annular phase of the eclipse lasted about 10 minutes and 55 seconds.



(http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100124.html)

monza
25-01-2010, 16:11
Discover the cosmos! (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 January 24

YlD9ULiMz80

Watch Jupiter Rotate
Credit: NASA (http://www.nasa.gov/), Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (http://www.jhuapl.edu/), Southwest Research Institute (http://www.swri.edu/) Explanation: What would it be like to coast by Jupiter and watch it rotate? This was just the experience of the New Horizons (http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/) spacecraft as it approached and flew by Jupiter in 2007. Clicking (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mouse_%28computing%29#Early_mice) on the image will bring up a movie (http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/common/content/videos/JupiterRotation.mpg) of what the robotic spacecraft saw. Visible above (http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/gallery/sciencePhotos/image.php?page=1&gallery_id=2&image_id=36) in the extensive atmosphere (http://csep10.phys.utk.edu/astr161/lect/jupiter/atmosphere.html) of the Solar System's largest planet are bands and belts (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap000429.html) of light and dark clouds, as well as giant rotating storm systems (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap990718.html) seen as ovals (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap990105.html). Other movies compiled by New Horizons (http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/gallery/sciencePhotos/view.php?gallery_id=2&page=1&bydate=2007-01) and other passing spacecraft (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap000926.html) have captured the clouds swirling (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap001123.html) and moving relative to themselves. Jupiter (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jupiter) has a diameter of about eleven times that of our Earth, and rotates once in about 10 hours. The robotic New Horizons (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Horizons) spacecraft, launched four years ago last week (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap060124.html), continues to speed toward the outer Solar System (http://www.kidsastronomy.com/solar_system.htm) and has recently passed the halfway point (http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/news_center/news/20091229.php) between Earth and Pluto. New Horizons will reach Pluto in 2015.


Note: Take an Astronomy Class Online for Free (http://bb.nightskylive.net/asterisk/viewforum.php?f=24)

(http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100125.html)

monza
25-01-2010, 16:24
Discover the cosmos! (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 January 25
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/magstream_nrao.jpg (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/magstream_nrao_big.jpg)
The Magellanic Stream
Credit: David L. Nidever (http://www.astro.virginia.edu/%7Edln5q/) et al. (http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AAS...21531803N), NRAO (http://www.nrao.edu/)/AUI (http://www.aui.edu/)/NSF (http://www.nsf.gov/) & A. Mellinger (http://www.phy.cmich.edu/people/mellinger/), LAB Survey (http://www.astro.uni-bonn.de/%7Ewebaiub/english/tools_labsurvey.php), Parkes Obs. (http://www.parkes.atnf.csiro.au/), Westerbork Obs. (http://www.astron.nl/radio-observatory/astronomers/wsrt-astronomers), Arecibo Obs. (http://www.naic.edu/) Explanation: Spanning the sky toward the majestic Clouds of Magellan is an unusual stream of gas: the Magellanic Stream. The origin of this gas remains unknown but likely holds a clue to the origin and fate of our Milky Way (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milky_Way)'s most famous satellite galaxies: the LMC (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap081219.html) and the SMC (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap071001.html). Until recently, two leading genesis hypotheses have been considered: that the stream (http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009NewA...14..692H) was created by gas stripped off these galaxies as they passed through the halo (http://www.livescience.com/space/080816-milky-way-map.html) of our Milky Way, or that the stream was created by the differential gravitational tug (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tidal_force) of the Milky Way. Recently, however, wide angle radio images -- including those from the Byrd Green Bank Telescope (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Green_Bank_Telescope) -- have shown that the Magellanic Stream (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magellanic_Stream) is longer and older than previously thought, perhaps as old as 2.5 billion years. These observations bolster a third possible origin for the stream (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap980826.html) -- that the Large and Small Magellanic Cloud (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap070330.html) galaxies once passed so close to each other that gravitational tides (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tidal_force) triggered a burst of star formation that left the stream. Pictured above (http://www.nrao.edu/pr/2010/magstream/) digitally superposed on a recently-completed all-sky image in visible light, the radio emission (http://www.nrao.edu/index.php/learn/radioastronomy/radiowaves) of Magellanic stream is shown in false color pink extending across the sky and ending at the two Magellanic galaxies (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap060806.html) on the lower right.


New Mirror: APOD now available in Hebrew from Israel (http://www.astronomia2009.org.il/info/apod/apod.htm)

(http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100126.html)

RIDER
27-01-2010, 19:38
Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 January 27
http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/tethystitan_cassini.jpg (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/tethystitan_cassini_big.jpg)
Tethys Behind Titan
Credit: Cassini Imaging Team (http://ciclops.org/), ISS (http://ciclops.org/iss/iss.php), JPL (http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/), ESA (http://www.esa.int/), NASA (http://www.nasa.gov/) Explanation: What's that behind Titan? It's another of Saturn's moons: Tethys (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tethys_%28moon%29). The robotic Cassini spacecraft (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/cassini/spacecraft/index.html) orbiting Saturn captured (http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA12528) the heavily cratered Tethys slipping behind Saturn's atmosphere-shrouded Titan (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Titan_%28moon%29) late last year. The largest crater on Tethys, Odysseus (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap070909.html), is easily visible on the distant moon. Titan shows not only its thick and opaque orange lower atmosphere (http://www.windows.ucar.edu/tour/link=/saturn/moons/titan_atmosphere_overview.html), but also an unusual upper layer of blue-tinted haze (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap040810.html). Tethys (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap091208.html), at about 2 million kilometers distant, was twice as far from Cassini as was Titan when the above image (http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA12528) was taken. In 2004, Cassini released the Hyugens probe (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Huygens_probe) which landed on Titan and provided humanity's first (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap050117.html) views (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap060508.html) of the surface (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap060131.html) of the Solar System's only known lake-bearing moon (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap070207.html).


Tomorrow's picture: open space

RIDER
28-01-2010, 10:58
<center> Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 January 28
http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/Kembles_Greg_Noel_900.jpg (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/Kembles_Greg_Noel.jpg)
</center> <center> Kemble's Cascade
Credit & Copyright (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/lib/about_apod.html#srapply): Processing - Noel Carboni (http://ncarboni.home.att.net/Astrophotography.html), Imaging - Greg Parker, New Forest Observatory (http://www.newforestobservatory.com/about/) </center> Explanation: An asterism (http://www.deep-sky.co.uk/asterisms.htm) is just a recognized pattern of stars that is not one the 88 official constellations. For example, one of the most famous (and largest) asterisms is the Big Dipper (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap060317.html) within the constellation Ursa Major. But this pretty chain of stars, visible with binoculars towards the long-necked (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giraffe) constellation (http://www.astro.wisc.edu/%7Edolan/constellations/extra/constellations.html) of Camelopardalis (http://www.dibonsmith.com/cam_con.htm), is also a recognized asterism. Known as Kemble's Cascade (http://www.agt.net/public/fenertyb/KmbCsc08.html), it contains about 20 stars nearly in a row, stretching over five times the width of a full moon (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap090416.html). Tumbling from the upper right to lower left in the picture, Kemble's Cascade was made popular by astronomy enthusiast Lucian Kemble (http://www.syz.com/rasc/scircles.htm#biography). The bright object at the lower left is the relatively compact open cluster (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/open_clusters.html) of stars, NGC 1502 (http://www.dibonsmith.com/ngc1502.htm).

<script type="text/javascript"> digg_url = 'http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100128.html'; digg_skin = 'compact'; </script> <script src="http://digg.com/tools/diggthis.js" type="text/javascript"></script><iframe src="http://digg.com/tools/diggthis.php?u=http%3A//apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100128.html&s=compact&t=Astronomy%20Picture%20of%20the%20Day" width="120" frameborder="0" height="18" scrolling="no"></iframe>
Tomorrow's picture: spiral nebula

monza
28-01-2010, 16:05
Discover the cosmos! (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 January 26 ;)
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/mynmareclipse_chin.jpg (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/mynmareclipse_chin_big.jpg)
Annular Eclipse Over Myanmar
Credit & Copyright: Wei Loon Chin (%20universe24%20at%20hotmail%20dot%20com) Explanation: A hole crossed the Sun for a few minutes this month, as seen across a thin swath of planet Earth. The event (http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/SEmono/ASE2010/ASE2010.html) on January 15 was actually an annular solar eclipse, and the hole (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap070528.html) was really Earth's Moon, an object whose dark half (http://www.badastronomy.com/bad/misc/dark_side.html) may appear even darker when compared to the tremendously bright Sun (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap091130.html). The Moon was too far (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orbit_of_the_Moon) from Earth to create a total solar eclipse (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap080920.html), but instead left well placed observers (http://spaceweather.com/eclipses/gallery_15jan10.htm) with a bright surrounding circle called the ring of fire (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap090125.html). Pictured above was a complete solar annular eclipse (http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/SEsearch/SEsearchmap.php?Ecl=20100115) sequence as seen above the Ananda Temple (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ananda_Temple) in Bagan (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bagan), Myanmar (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burma). The image of the ancient temple, built around the year 1100, was taken after sunset on the same day of the eclipse. The next solar eclipse (http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/SEmono/TSE2010/TSE2010.html) will be a total solar eclipse (http://www.mreclipse.com/Special/SEprimer.html) during 2010 July.



(http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100127.html)

RIDER
30-01-2010, 10:00
<center> Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 January 30
http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/m88ms_block_c900.jpg (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/m88ms_block_crop.jpg)
</center> <center> Messier 88
Credit & Copyright (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/lib/about_apod.html#srapply): Adam Block (http://www.caelumobservatory.com/index.html), Mt. Lemmon SkyCenter (http://skycenter.arizona.edu/), U. Arizona (http://www.as.arizona.edu/) </center> Explanation: Charles Messier described the 88th entry in his 18th century catalog of Nebulae and Star Clusters (http://seds.org/messier/xtra/history/m-cat.html) as a spiral nebula without stars. Of course the gorgeous M88 (http://seds.org/Messier/m/m088.html) is now understood (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap080124.html) to be a galaxy full of stars, gas, and dust, not unlike our own Milky Way. In fact, M88 is one of the brightest galaxies in the Virgo Galaxy Cluster (http://www.atlasoftheuniverse.com/galgrps/vir.html) some 50 million light-years away (http://nedwww.ipac.caltech.edu/cgi-bin/nDistance?name=MESSIER+088). M88's beautiful spiral arms are easy to trace in this colorful cosmic portait (http://www.caelumobservatory.com/gallery/m88.shtml). The arms are lined with young blue star clusters (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap990402.html), pink star-forming regions (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap080928.html), and obscuring dust lanes (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap090615.html) extending from a yellowish core dominated by an older population of stars. Spiral galaxy M88 spans over 100,000 light-years.

<script type="text/javascript"> digg_url = 'http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100130.html'; digg_skin = 'compact'; </script> <script src="http://digg.com/tools/diggthis.js" type="text/javascript"></script><iframe src="http://digg.com/tools/diggthis.php?u=http%3A//apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100130.html&s=compact&t=Astronomy%20Picture%20of%20the%20Day" width="120" frameborder="0" height="18" scrolling="no"></iframe>
Tomorrow's picture: mysterious manuscript

monza
31-01-2010, 02:43
Discover the cosmos! (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 January 29 ;)
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/mars_opposition_2010.jpg (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/mars_opposition_2010.jpg)
Mars Opposition 2010
Credit & Copyright (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/lib/about_apod.html#srapply): Alan Friedman (%20alan%20at%20greatarrow%20dot%20com) (Averted Imagination (http://www.avertedimagination.com/main1.htm)) Explanation: Mars (http://www.nasa.gov/worldbook/mars_worldbook.html) is at opposition tonight (http://seds.org/%7Espider/spider/Mars/mars2010.html), opposite the Sun in planet Earth's sky. Of course, it will be easy to spot because Mars appears (http://www.otastro.org/Mars2005/) close to tonight's Full Moon, also opposite the Sun in Earth's night sky in the constellation Cancer. For this opposition, Mars remains (http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2010/26jan_mars.htm) just over 99 million kilometers away, not a particularly close approach for the Red Planet (http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/). Still, this sharp view (http://www.avertedimagination.com/img_pages/mars_DMK_20100122.html) of Mars recorded on January 22nd is an example of the telescopic images possible in the coming days. The planet's whitish north polar cap is at the upper right. Mars' tiny red disk is about 14 arcseconds (http://coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu/cosmic_classroom/cosmic_reference/angular.html) in angular diameter, less than 1/100th the diameter of the Full Moon (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap080801.html).



(http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100130.html)

monza
01-02-2010, 13:54
Discover the cosmos! (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 January 31
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/voynich_schaefer.jpg (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/voynich_schaefer_big.gif)
The Mysterious Voynich Manuscript
Credit: Yale University (http://www.library.yale.edu/) ; Digital Copyright: B. E. Schaefer (http://www.phys.lsu.edu/newwebsite/people/schaefer.html) (LSU (http://www.phys.lsu.edu/)) Explanation: The ancient text has no known title, no known author, and is written in no known language: what does it say and why does it have many astronomy illustrations? The mysterious book (http://www.crystalinks.com/voynich.html) was once bought by an emperor (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rudolf_II,_Holy_Roman_Emperor), forgotten on a library shelf, sold for thousands of dollars, and later donated to Yale (http://www.yale.edu/). Possibly written in the 15th century, the over 200-page volume is known most recently as the Voynich Manuscript (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voynich_manuscript), after its (re-)discoverer in 1912. Pictured above is an illustration from the book that appears to be somehow related to the Sun. The book (http://www.voynich.com/) labels some patches of the sky with unfamiliar constellations. The inability of modern historians of astronomy (http://www.historyofastronomy.org/) to understand the origins of these constellations (http://www.adlerplanetarium.org/research/collections/constellations/index.shtml) is perhaps dwarfed by the inability of modern code-breakers to understand the book (http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/voynich.html)'s text. Can the eclectic brain trust of APOD readers (http://www.monroegallery.com/showcase/images/3D_Glasses.jpg) make any progress? If you think you can provide any insight, instead of sending us email ([email protected]) please participate (http://bb.nightskylive.net/asterisk/viewtopic.php?t=349) in a fresh online discussion (http://bb.nightskylive.net/asterisk/discuss_apod.php?date=100131). The book itself remains in Yale's rare book collection (http://www.library.yale.edu/beinecke/) under catalog number "MS 408."



(http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100201.html)

monza
01-02-2010, 13:59
Discover the cosmos! (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 February 1
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1002/prometheus_cassini.jpg (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1002/prometheus_cassini_big.jpg)
Shepherd Moon Prometheus from Cassini
Credit: Cassini Imaging Team (http://ciclops.org/), SSI (http://www.spacescience.org/), JPL (http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/), ESA (http://www.esa.int/), NASA (http://www.nasa.gov/) Explanation: Another moon of Saturn has been imaged in detail by the Cassini spacecraft. Orbiting Saturn since 2004, the robotic Cassini (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cassini%E2%80%93Huygens) got its closest look yet at Saturn's small moon Prometheus (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prometheus_%28moon%29) last week. Visible above (http://ciclops.org/view/6171/Prometheus_Rev_125_Flyby_Raw_Preview) in an unprocessed image from 36,000 kilometers away, Prometheus' (http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00002321/) 100-km long surface was revealed to have an interesting system of bulges, ridges, and craters. These features, together with the moon's oblong shape and high reflectivity, are now being studied to help better understand the history of Prometheus (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap041217.html) and Saturn's rings. Prometheus is one of the few shepherd satellites (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shepherd_satellite) known, as its gravity, along with its companion moon Pandora (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap051123.html), confines many smaller ice chucks into Saturn's F Ring (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap951223.html). Cassini's next major targeted flyby (http://www.planetary.org/explore/topics/cassini_huygens/tour.html#xm) is of the moon Rhea (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap080513.html) on March 2.



(http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100202.html)

monza
02-02-2010, 12:48
Discover the cosmos! (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Farchi vepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 February 2
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1002/marsbow_pacholka.jpg (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fimage %2F1002%2Fmarsbow_pacholka_big.jpg)
Mars and a Colorful Lunar Fog Bow
Credit & Copyright (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Flib%2 Fabout_apod.html%23srapply): Wally Pacholka (AstroPics.com, TWAN (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.twanight.org%2F)) Explanation: Even from the top of a volcanic crater, this vista was unusual. For one reason, Mars (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FMa rs) was dazzlingly bright two weeks ago, when this picture was taken, as it (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap080 714.html) was nearing its brightest time of the entire year. Mars (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap100 129.html), on the far upper left, is the brightest object in the above picture. The brightness of the red planet (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fseds.org%2F%257Espider%2Fspi der%2FMars%2Fmars2010.html) peaked last week near when Mars reached opposition (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FOp position_%2528planets%2529), the time when Earth and Mars are closest together in their orbits. Arching across the lower part of the image is a rare lunar fog bow (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FFo g_bow). Unlike a more commonly seen rainbow (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap060 702.html), which is created by sunlight reflected prism (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fmicro.magnet.fsu.edu%2Fprime r%2Fjava%2Fprism%2F)atically by falling rain, this fog bow (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap080 529.html) was created by moonlight reflected (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap090 810.html) by the small water drops that compose fog (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FFo g). Although most fog bows (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.twanight.org%2FnewTWAN%2 Fphotos.asp%3FID%3D3001972%26Sort%3DPhotographer) appear white, all of the colors (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FSp ectrum) of the rainbow were somehow visible here. The above image was taken from high atop Haleakala (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FHa leakala), a huge volcano in Hawaii (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FHa waii), USA (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FUn ited_States).



(http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap100 203.html)

RIDER
03-02-2010, 14:09
Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 February 3
http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1002/p2010a2_hst.jpg (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1002/p2010a2_hst_big.jpg)
<center> P/2010 A2: Unusual Asteroid Tail Implies Powerful Collision
Credit: NASA (http://www.nasa.gov/), ESA (http://www.esa.int/), D. Jewitt (http://www2.ess.ucla.edu/%7Ejewitt/David_Jewitt.html) (UCLA (http://www.ess.ucla.edu/)) </center> Explanation: What is this strange object? First discovered on ground based LINEAR (http://www.ll.mit.edu/mission/space/linear/) images on January 6, the object appeared unusual enough to investigate further with the Hubble Space Telescope (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap090525.html) last week. Pictured above (http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2010/07/full/), what Hubble saw indicates that P/2010 A2 is unlike any object ever seen before. At first glance, the object appears to have the tail of a comet (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap071003.html). Close inspection, however, shows a 140-meter nucleus (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap100104.html) offset from the tail center, very unusual structure near the nucleus, and no discernable gas in the tail. Knowing that the object orbits (http://ssd.jpl.nasa.gov/sbdb.cgi?sstr=P/2010+A2;orb=1) in the asteroid belt (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asteroid_belt) between Mars (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap080714.html) and Jupiter (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap080108.html), a preliminary hypothesis that appears to explain all of the known clues is that P/2010 A2 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/P/2010_A2) is the debris left over from a recent collision between two small asteroids. If true, the collision (http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/badastronomy/2010/02/02/hubble-captures-picture-of-asteroid-collision/) likely occurred at over 15,000 kilometers per hour -- five times the speed of a rifle bullet -- and liberated energy in excess of a nuclear bomb. Pressure from sunlight (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poynting%E2%80%93Robertson_effect) would then spread out the debris into a trailing tail. Future study of P/2010 A2 (http://transientsky.wordpress.com/2010/01/10/the-curious-case-of-comet-linear/) may better indicate the nature of the progenitor collision and may help humanity better understand the early years of our Solar System (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Formation_and_evolution_of_the_Solar_System), when many similar collisions occurred.

<script type="text/javascript"> digg_url = 'http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100203.html'; digg_skin = 'compact'; </script> <script src="http://digg.com/tools/diggthis.js" type="text/javascript"></script><iframe src="http://digg.com/tools/diggthis.php?u=http%3A//apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100203.html&s=compact&t=Astronomy%20Picture%20of%20the%20Day" width="120" frameborder="0" height="18" scrolling="no"></iframe>
Tomorrow's picture: open space

monza
06-02-2010, 02:10
Discover the cosmos! (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Farchi vepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 February 4
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1002/NGC1333ruiz900.jpg (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fimage %2F1002%2FNGC1333ruiz.jpg)
Stardust in Perseus
Credit & Copyright (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Flib%2 Fabout_apod.html%23srapply): Máximo Ruiz (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.astromodelismo.es%2Finde x.htm) Explanation: This cosmic expanse of dust, gas, and stars covers close to 3 degrees on the sky in the heroic constellation Perseus (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.windows.ucar.edu%2Ftour% 2Flink%3D%2Fthe_universe%2FConstellations%2Fperseus.html%26e du%3Dhigh). Right of center in the gorgeous skyscape (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.astromodelismo.es%2FWeb% 2520Astronomia%2FWeb%2520enlazables%2FFotos%2520propias%2FNe bulosas%2Findex.htm) is the dusty blue reflection nebula NGC 1333 (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fseds.org%2F%257Espider%2Fngc %2Fngc.cgi%3F1333), about 1,000 light-years away. At that estimated distance, the field of view is about 50 light-years across. Next to NGC 1333 is the reddish glow of shocked hydrogen gas created by energetic jets and winds from stars in the process of formation. Other reflection nebulae are scattered around, along with remarkable dark dust (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap070 511.html) nebulae. Near the edge of a large molecular cloud (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Farchive.ncsa.uiuc.edu%2FCybe ria%2FBima%2FGMC.html), they tend to hide (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap061 006.html) the newly formed stars (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nasa.gov%2Fmission_pages %2Fspitzer%2Fmultimedia%2Fspitzer20070829b.html) and young stellar objects or protostars from prying optical telescopes. Collapsing due to self-gravity (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fhyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu%2Fhbase%2Fastro%2Fgravc.html), the protostars form (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Farchive.ncsa.uiuc.edu%2FCybe ria%2FBima%2FStarForm.html) around dense cores embedded in the molecular cloud.



(http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap100 205.html)

monza
06-02-2010, 02:15
Discover the cosmos! (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 February 5
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1002/MarsDust_picdumidi_c740.jpg (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1002/MarsDust_picdumidi.jpg)
Dust Storm on Mars
Credit & Copyright (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/lib/about_apod.html#srapply): Jean-Luc Dauvergne (http://astrophotography.fr/), Francois Colas (francois%20dot%20colas%20at%20imcce%20dot%20fr), IMCCE (http://www.imcce.fr/)/S2P, Obs. Midi-Pyrénées (http://ezomp.omp.obs-mip.fr/) Explanation: It's spring for the northern hemisphere of Mars and spring on Mars (http://www-mgcm.arc.nasa.gov/) usually means dust storms (http://www.msss.com/mars_images/moc/9_12_00_dust_storm/). So the dramatic brown swath of dust (top) marking the otherwise white north polar cap in this picture of the Red Planet (http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/) is not really surprising. Taking advantage of the good views of Mars currently (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100129.html) possible near opposition and its closest approach to planet Earth in 2010, this sharp image shows the evolving dust storm extending from the large dark region known as Mare Acidalium (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mare_Acidalium_quadrangle) below the polar cap. It was recorded on February 2nd with the 1 meter telescope at Pic Du Midi (http://bagn.obs-mip.fr/webcamV2/), a mountain top (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap080125.html) observatory in the French Pyrenees.



(http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100206.html)

monza
08-02-2010, 17:02
Discover the cosmos! (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Farchi vepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 February 6
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1002/2010hongkongsky_lau_1_900.jpg (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fimage %2F1002%2F2010hongkongsky_lau_1_2048.jpg)
Hong Kong Sky
Credit & Copyright (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Flib%2 Fabout_apod.html%23srapply): Peter Lau Explanation: This remarkable scene combines multiple exposures recorded on the evening of January 18th from a waterside perspective in Hong Kong, China (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FFi le%3AHong_Kong_Skyline_Restitch_-_Dec_2007.jpg). It follows a young crescent Moon (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap050 513.html), with brilliant planet Jupiter (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap080 202.html) to its left, as they set together in the western sky. Their two luminous trails are faintly paralleled by trails of (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap090 314.html) background stars. But easier to pick out are the short, bright airplane trails converging toward the horizon and the Hong Kong International Airport that seem to offer a frenzied imitation of the celestial tracks (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap091 128.html). Of course, the reflection of city lights and boat traffic follows the water's surface. Streaking (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap080 604.html) car lights define the span of the cable-stayed Ting Kau bridge.



(http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap100 207.html)

monza
08-02-2010, 17:05
[/URL] [URL="http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html"]Discover the cosmos! (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Farchi vepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 February 7
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1002/qso2237_wiyn.jpg (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1002/qso2237_wiyn_big.jpg)
The Einstein Cross Gravitational Lens
Credit & Copyright (http://www.noao.edu/image_gallery/copyright.html): J. Rhoads (http://sese.asu.edu/person/james-rhoads) (ASU (http://sese.asu.edu/)) et al., WIYN (http://www.noao.edu/wiyn/wiyn.html), AURA (http://www.aura-astronomy.org/), NOAO (http://www.noao.edu/), NSF (http://www.nsf.gov/) Explanation: Most galaxies have a single nucleus -- does this galaxy have four? The strange answer leads astronomers (http://aas.org/education/careers.php) to conclude that the nucleus of the surrounding galaxy is not even visible in this image (http://www.noao.edu/image_gallery/html/im0553.html). The central cloverleaf (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four-leaf_clover) is rather light emitted from a background quasar (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap980409.html). The gravitational field of the visible foreground galaxy breaks light from this distant quasar (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap000419.html) into four distinct images. The quasar (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap981226.html) must be properly aligned behind the center of a massive galaxy for a mirage like this (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap990331.html) to be evident. The general effect is known as gravitational lensing (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravitational_lens), and this specific case is known as the Einstein Cross (http://www.astr.ua.edu/keel/agn/qso2237.html). Stranger still, the images of the Einstein Cross (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap961215.html) vary in relative brightness, enhanced occasionally by the additional gravitational microlensing (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap021215.html) effect of specific stars in the foreground galaxy.


Tomorrow's picture: angkor sun




(http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap100 208.html)

monza
08-02-2010, 17:07
Discover the cosmos! (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Farchi vepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 February 8
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1002/sunhalo_attila.jpg (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fimage %2F1002%2Fsunhalo_attila_big.jpg)
A Sun Halo Over Cambodia
Credit & Copyright (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fnakedeye.blog.hu%2F2008%2F02 %2F07%2Fwww_nakedeye_hu): Nagy Attila Explanation: Have you ever seen a halo around the Sun? This fairly common sight occurs when high thin clouds (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fww2010.atmos.uiuc.edu%2F%252 8Gh%2529%2Fguides%2Fmtr%2Fcld%2Fcldtyp%2Fhgh%2Fcrs.rxml) containing millions of tiny ice crystals (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.its.caltech.edu%2F%257Ea tomic%2Fsnowcrystals%2Fphotos%2Fphotos.htm) cover much of the sky. Each ice crystal (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FIc e_crystal) acts like a miniature lens (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FHa lo_%2528optical_phenomenon%2529). Because most (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.atoptics.co.uk%2Fhalo%2F xtalreal.htm) of the crystals have a similar elongated hexagonal (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap091 214.html) shape, light entering one crystal face and exiting through the opposing face refracts 22 degrees (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fmintaka.sdsu.edu%2FGF%2Fexpl ain%2Fatmos_refr%2Fangles.html), which corresponds to the radius of the Sun halo (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fww2010.atmos.uiuc.edu%2F%252 8Gh%2529%2Fguides%2Fmtr%2Fopt%2Fice%2Fhalo%2F22.rxml). A similar Moon halo (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap030 321.html) may be visible during the night. Pictured above (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Findafoto.hu%2Fnaked%2Fimage% 2F6713745-796bca69%2Fdetails%2Fm), a nearly complete sun halo (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap060 613.html) was photographed high above the ancient Bayon temple (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FBa yon_Temple) in Angkor (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FAn gkor), Cambodia (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FCa mbodia). Exactly how ice-crystals form (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.its.caltech.edu%2F%257Ea tomic%2Fsnowcrystals%2Fprimer%2Fprimer.htm) in clouds remains under investigation (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fadsabs.harvard.edu%2Fabs%2F1 995dri..rept.....H).



(http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap100 209.html)

monza
10-02-2010, 17:12
[/URL] [URL="http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html"]Discover the cosmos! (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Farchi vepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 February 9
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1002/sts30nightlaunch_nasa.jpg (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1002/sts30nightlaunch_nasa_big.jpg)
Night Launch of the Space Shuttle Endeavour
Credit: NASA (http://www.nasa.gov/) Explanation: Sometimes, the space shuttle launches (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/launch/night_launches.html) at night. Pictured above (http://mediaarchive.ksc.nasa.gov/detail.cfm?mediaid=45510), the space shuttle Endeavour lifted off in yesterday's early morning hours from Launch Pad 39A (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kennedy_Space_Center_Launch_Complex_39) in Kennedy Space Center (http://www.nasa.gov/centers/kennedy/home/index.html), Florida (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Florida), USA (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States), bound for the International Space Station (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/main/index.html) (ISS). A night launch (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/16061584/from/ET/), useful for reaching the space station easily during some times of the year, frequently creates vivid launch imagery. The shuttle, as pictured above (http://mediaarchive.ksc.nasa.gov/detail.cfm?mediaid=45510), is framed by an enormous but typical exhaust plume (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap080316.html) ejected as the shuttle's powerful rockets (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap011115.html) began lifting the two million kilogram space bus (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_shuttle) into Earth orbit (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Low_earth_orbit). Endeavour's mission, labeled STS-130 (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts130/index.html), includes the delivery (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/STS-130) of the Tranquility module (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tranquility_%28ISS_module%29) to the space station. Tranquility will provide extra room for space station astronauts and includes a large circular set of windows (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cupola_%28ISS%29) designed to bestow vastly improved views of the Earth, the night sky, and the space station itself (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap091207.html).

(http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap100 210.html)

monza
10-02-2010, 17:24
[/URL] [URL="http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html"]Discover the cosmos! (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Farchi vepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 February 10
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1002/volcanolightning_rietze.jpg (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1002/volcanolightning_rietze_big.jpg)
Sakurajima Volcano with Lightning
Credit & Copyright: Martin Rietze (http://www.mrietze.com/info.htm) (Alien Landscapes on Planet Earth (http://www.mrietze.com/)) Explanation: Why does a volcanic eruption sometimes create lightning? Pictured above, the Sakurajima volcano (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sakurajima) in southern Japan (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japan) was caught erupting early last month. Magma bubbles (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap051002.html) so hot they glow (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Incandescence) shoot away as liquid rock bursts through the Earth's surface from below. The above image (http://www.mrietze.com/images/japan09/Jap92115.jpg) is particularly notable, however, for the lightning bolts caught near the volcano's summit. Why lightning (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lightning) occurs even in common thunderstorms remains a topic of research, and the cause of volcanic lightning is even less clear. Surely, lightning bolts (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap080705.html) help quench areas of opposite but separated electric charges. One hypothesis holds (http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/augustine.html) that catapulting magma bubbles or volcanic ash are themselves electrically charged, and by their motion create these separated areas. Other volcanic lightning (http://geology.com/articles/volcanic-lightning/) episodes may be facilitated by charge-inducing collisions in volcanic dust. Lightning (http://science.howstuffworks.com/lightning.htm) is usually occurring somewhere on Earth, typically over 40 times each second.

RIDER
11-02-2010, 20:37
Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 February 11
http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1002/m34Franke900.jpg (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1002/m34Franke.jpg)
Star Cluster M34
Credit & Copyright (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/lib/about_apod.html#srapply): Bob Franke (http://bf-astro.com/) Explanation: This pretty (http://bf-astro.com/m34/m34.htm) open cluster of stars, M34, (http://seds.org/messier/m/m034.html) is about the size of the Full Moon on the sky. Easy to appreciate in small telescopes, it lies some 1,800 light-years away in the constellation Perseus (http://www.windows.ucar.edu/tour/link=/the_universe/Constellations/perseus.html&edu=high). At that distance, M34 physically spans about 15 light-years. Formed at the same time from the same cloud of dust and gas, all the stars of M34 (http://arxiv.org/abs/0805.3156) are about 200 million years young. But like any open star cluster (http://www.astrophysicsspectator.com/topics/milkyway/OpenClusters.html) orbiting in the plane of our galaxy (http://www.atlasoftheuniverse.com/nebclust.html), M34 will eventually disperse as it experiences gravitational tides and encounters with the Milky Way's (http://casswww.ucsd.edu/public/tutorial/MW.html) interstellar clouds and other stars. Over four billion years ago, our own Sun was likely formed in a similar open star cluster (http://seds.org/MESSIER/open.html).


Tomorrow's picture: Teide Sky

RIDER
12-02-2010, 22:35
<center> Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 February 12
http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1002/IRIDIUM_Teide_DLopez900.jpg (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1002/startrails_Teide_IRIDIUM_DLopez.jpg)
</center> <center> Teide Sky Trails
Credit & Copyright (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/lib/about_apod.html#srapply): Daniel López (%20dlp%20at%20iac%20dot%20es) </center> Explanation: The snow capped Teide volcano (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teide) is reflected in a pool of water in this nearly symmetric night sky view from the Canary Island Tenerife. Bright north star (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap070108.html) Polaris stands above the peak in an exposure that also captures the brilliant trail (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap991022.html) of a polar orbiting Iridium (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap090218.html) satellite. Of course, with the camera fixed (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap090314.html) to a tripod, the stars themselves produce concentric trails in long exposures, a reflection of the Earth's rotation around (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap070519.html) its axis. In fact, you can add about 4.5 hours of exposure time to this image by just sliding your cursor over the picture. Large astronomical observatories (http://www.iac.es/?lang=en) also take advantage of the calm Canary Island sky.

<script type="text/javascript"> digg_url = 'http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100212.html'; digg_skin = 'compact'; </script> <script src="http://digg.com/tools/diggthis.js" type="text/javascript"></script><iframe src="http://digg.com/tools/diggthis.php?u=http%3A//apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100212.html&s=compact&t=Astronomy%20Picture%20of%20the%20Day" width="120" frameborder="0" height="18" scrolling="no"></iframe>
Tomorrow's picture: waterway to orbit

RIDER
13-02-2010, 09:00
Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 February 13
http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1002/launch_vernacotola900.jpg (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1002/launch_vernacotola.jpg)
Waterway to Orbit
Credit & Copyright (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/lib/about_apod.html#srapply): James Vernacotola (http://jimmyv99.smugmug.com/Space) Explanation: The 32nd shuttle mission to the International Space Station, STS-130 (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts130/index.html), left planet Earth (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap100210.html) on February 8. Its early morning launch to orbit (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap100209.html) from Kennedy Space Center's pad 39A followed the long, graceful, eastward arc seen in this 2 minute time exposure. Well composed, the dramatic picture also shows the arc's watery reflection from the Intracoastal Waterway (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intracoastal_Waterway) Bridge, in Ponte Vedra, Florida, about 115 miles north of the launch site. In the celestial background a waning crescent Moon and stars left their own short trails against the still dark sky. The brightest star trail near the moon was made by red supergiant Antares (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap090708.html), alpha star of the constellation Scorpius.


Tomorrow's picture: rosette field

monza
16-02-2010, 11:56
Discover the cosmos! (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 February 14
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1002/rosette_andreo.jpg (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1002/rosette_andreo_bigs.jpg)
Field of Rosette
Credit & Copyright: Rogelio Bernal Andreo (http://blog.deepskycolors.com/about.html) (Deep Sky Colors) Explanation: What surrounds the florid Rosette nebula? To better picture this area of the sky, the famous flowery (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap070214.html) emission nebula (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/emission_nebulae.html) on the far right has been captured recently in a deep and dramatic wide field image that features several other sky highlights. Designated NGC 2237, the center of the Rosette nebula (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosette_Nebula) is populated by the bright blue stars of open cluster NGC 2244 (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap020317.html), whose winds (http://solarscience.msfc.nasa.gov/SolarWind.shtml) and energetic light are evacuating the nebula's center. Below the famous flower, a symbol of Valentine's Day (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Valentine%27s_day), is a column of dust and gas (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap080214.html) that appears like a rose's stem but extends hundreds of light years. Across the above image (http://deepskycolors.com/pics/astro/2009/12/mg_2009-12-01_RosetteConeWF_HaRRGB.jpg?), the bright blue star just left and below the center is called S Monocerotis (http://stars.astro.illinois.edu/sow/15mon.html). The star is part of the open cluster (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/open_clusters.html) of stars labelled NGC 2264 and known as the Snowflake cluster (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap070509.html). To the right of S Mon is a dark pointy featured called the Cone nebula (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap040529.html), a nebula likely shaped by winds flowing out a massive star obscured by dust. To the left of S Mon is the Fox Fur nebula (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap080422.html), a tumultuous region (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap081123.html) created by the rapidly evolving Snowflake cluster. The Rosette region, at about 5,000 light years (http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/cosmic_distance.html) distant, is about twice as far away as the region surrounding S Mon. The entire field (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap090411.html) can be seen with a small telescope toward the constellation of the Unicorn (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unicorn) (Monoceros (http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/constellations/monoceros.html)).


Note: Take an Astronomy Class Online for Free (http://bb.nightskylive.net/asterisk/viewforum.php?f=24)

monza
16-02-2010, 11:57
Discover the cosmos! (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 February 15
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1002/saturnplane_cassini.jpg (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1002/saturnplane_cassini_big.jpg)
Cassini Spacecraft Crosses Saturn's Ring Plane
Credit: Cassini Imaging Team (http://ciclops.org/), ISS (http://ciclops.org/iss/iss.php), JPL (http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/), ESA (http://www.esa.int/), NASA (http://www.nasa.gov/) Explanation: If this is Saturn, where are the rings? When Saturn's "appendages" disappeared (http://www2.jpl.nasa.gov/saturn/back.html) in 1612, Galileo (http://www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/%7Ehistory/Mathematicians/Galileo.html) did not understand why. Later that century, it became understood that Saturn (http://www.nineplanets.org/saturn.html)'s unusual protrusions were rings and that when the Earth crosses the ring plane (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap950801.html), the edge-on rings will appear to disappear. This is because Saturn's rings are confined to a plane many times thinner (http://coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu/cosmic_kids/AskKids/saturnrings.shtml), in proportion, than a razor blade (http://www.quikshave.com/timeline.htm). In modern times, the robot Cassini spacecraft (http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/overview/mission.cfm) orbiting Saturn now also crosses Saturn's ring (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap040117.html) plane. A series of plane crossing images from 2005 February was dug out of the vast online Cassini raw image (http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/images/raw/index.cfm) archive by interested Spanish amateur Fernando Garcia Navarro. Pictured above, digitally cropped and set in representative colors, is the striking result. Saturn's thin ring plane (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap080720.html) appears in blue, bands and clouds in Saturn's upper atmosphere (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap041102.html) appear in gold. Since Saturn just passed its equinox (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap091110.html), today the ring plane is pointed close to the Sun and the rings could not cast the high dark shadows (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap090901.html) seen across the top of this image, taken back in 2005. Moons appear as bumps in the rings.

monza
16-02-2010, 11:58
Discover the cosmos! (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 February 16
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1002/shuttleapproaching_nasa.jpg (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1002/shuttleapproaching_nasa_big.jpg)
Dark Shuttle Approaching
Credit: Expedition 22 (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/expeditions/expedition22/index.html) Crew, NASA (http://www.nasa.gov/) Explanation: What's that approaching? Astronauts on board the International Space Station (http://iss.cet.edu/) first saw it far in the distance. Soon it enlarged to become a dark silhouette (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silhouette). As it came even closer, the silhouette (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap060921.html) appeared to be a spaceship. Finally, at just past 11 pm (CST (http://wwp.greenwichmeantime.com/time-zone/usa/central-time/)) last Tuesday, the object, revealed to be the Space Shuttle Endeavor (http://science.ksc.nasa.gov/shuttle/resources/orbiters/endeavour.html), docked as expected with the Earth-orbiting space station. Pictured above (http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/gallery/images/shuttle/sts-130/html/iss022e062672.html), Endeavor was imaged near Earth's horizon as it approached, where several layers of the Earth's atmosphere (http://csep10.phys.utk.edu/astr161/lect/earth/atmosphere.html) were visible. Directly behind the shuttle is the mesosphere (http://www.windows.ucar.edu/tour/link=/earth/Atmosphere/mesosphere.html), which appears blue. The atmospheric layer that appears white is the stratosphere (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stratosphere), while the orange layer is Earth's Troposphere (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Troposphere). This shuttle mission, which began with a dramatic night launch (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100209.html) and will continue into next week, has many tasks planned (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts130/index.html). These tasks include the delivery of the Tranquility Module (http://www.nasa.gov/centers/kennedy/stationpayloads/tranquility.html) which includes a cupola bay window complex (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cupola_%28ISS%29) that may allow even better views of spaceships approaching and leaving the space station.

RIDER
17-02-2010, 09:59
Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 February 17
http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1002/calypso_cassini.jpg (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1002/calypso_cassini_big.jpg)
An Unusually Smooth Surface on Saturn's Calypso
Credit: Cassini Imaging Team (http://ciclops.org/), SSI (http://www.spacescience.org/), JPL (http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/), ESA (http://www.esa.int/), NASA (http://www.nasa.gov/) Explanation: Why is this moon of Saturn so smooth? This past weekend, humanity's Saturn-orbiting Cassini (http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/mission/introduction/) spacecraft passed (http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/mission/saturntourdates/saturntourdates2010/) as close to Saturn's small moon Calypso as it ever has, and imaged the small moon in unprecedented detail. Pictured above (http://ciclops.org/view/6204/Calypso_Rev_126_Flyby_Raw_Preview_1) is an early return, raw, unprocessed image of the 20-km long irregularly shaped moon. Like its sister moon Telesto (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap060222.html) and the shepherd moon Pandor (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pandora_%28moon%29)a (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fictional_universe_of_Avatar), Calypso has shown itself to be usually smooth, much smoother than most of Saturn's larger moons. A leading hypothesis for Calypso (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calypso_%28moon%29)'s smoothness is that much of the moon's surface is actually a relatively loose jumble of rubble -- making Calypso (http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00002345/) a rubble-pile (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rubble_pile) moon. The loose nature of the small ice pieces (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap070422.html) allows them to fill in many small craters and other surface features. Calypso orbits Saturn always behind Saturn's much larger moon Tethys (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap091208.html), whereas Telesto's orbit always precedes Tethys. Calypso's extremely white surface -- not unlike fresh snow (http://modis.gsfc.nasa.gov/gallery/individual.php?db_date=2010-02-10) -- may result from the continuous accumulation of fresh ice particles falling in from Saturn's E ring (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap070327.html).


Tomorrow's picture: pixels in space

RIDER
18-02-2010, 19:02
Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 February 18
http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1002/Vesta2panel_westlake.jpg (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1002/Vesta2panel_westlake.jpg)
Vesta Near Opposition
Credit & Copyright (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/lib/about_apod.html#srapply): Jimmy Westlake (http://www.jwestlake.com/JRWjr_Astrphotography/Welcome.html) Explanation: Main belt asteroid (http://www.solstation.com/stars/asteroid.htm) 4 Vesta is at its brightest now. The small world (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap070622.html) is near opposition (opposite the Sun in the sky) and closest to Earth. But even at its brightest, Vesta is (http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/1997/27) just too faint to spot with the naked-eye. Still, over the next few days it will be relatively easy to find in the constellation Leo, sharing a typical binocular field of view with bright star Gamma Leonis (aka Algieba) (http://www.earthsky.org/tonighthome/2010-02-17/). In fact on February 16 Vesta passed between (http://www.skyandtelescope.com/observing/home/80433142.html) Gamma Leonis and close neighbor on the sky 40 Leonis. Gamma Leonis is the brightest star in these two panels, while the second brightest star, 40 Leonis, is directy to its right. As marked, Vesta is the third brightest "star" in the field. Vesta shifts position between the two panels from well below 40 Leonis on Feb. 14 to near the top of the frame from Feb. 16, shooting the gap between the close Gamma/40 Leonis pair. Of course, premier close-up views of the asteroid will be possible after the ion-powered Dawn (http://dawn.jpl.nasa.gov/index.asp) spacecraft arrives at Vesta in August of 2011.


Tomorrow's picture: highway in the sky

RIDER
19-02-2010, 18:52
Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 February 19
http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1002/andromeda_wise900.jpg (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1002/andromeda_wise2048.jpg)
WISE Infrared Andromeda
Credit: NASA (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/WISE/main/index.html) / JPL-Caltech / UCLA Explanation: This sharp, wide-field view (http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA12832) features infrared light (http://coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu/cosmic_classroom/ir_tutorial/index.html) from the spiral Andromeda Galaxy (M31) (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap100109.html). Dust heated by Andromeda's young stars is shown in yellow and red, while its older population of stars appears as a bluish haze. The false-color skyscape is a mosaic of images from NASA's new Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/WISE/main/index.html) (WISE) satellite. With over twice the diameter of our Milky Way, Andromeda is the largest galaxy in the local group (http://www.atlasoftheuniverse.com/localgr.html). Andromeda's own satellite galaxies M110 (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap080909.html) (below) and M32 (http://www.seds.org/messier/m/m032.html) (above) are also included in the combined fields. Launched in December 2009, WISE began a six month long infrared survey of the entire sky on January 14. Expected to discover near-Earth asteroids (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/WISE/news/wise20100122.html) as well as explore the distant universe, its sensitive infrared detectors are cooled by frozen hydrogen (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/WISE/spacecraft/index.html).


Tomorrow's picture: highway in the sky

RIDER
20-02-2010, 16:43
Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 February 20
http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1002/GS-Trails2sTafreshi.jpg (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1002/GS-Trails2Tafreshi.jpg)
Geostationary Highway
Credit & Copyright (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/lib/about_apod.html#srapply): Babak Tafreshi (http://www.twanight.org/tafreshi) (TWAN (http://www.twanight.org/)) Explanation: Put a satellite (http://www2.jpl.nasa.gov/basics/bsf5-1.php) in a circular orbit about 42,000 kilometers from the center of the Earth (36,000 kilometers or so above the surface) and it will orbit once in 24 hours. Because that matches Earth's rotation period, it is known as a geosynchronous orbit. If that orbit is also in the plane of the equator, the satellite will hang in the sky over a fixed location in a geostationary orbit (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geostationary_orbit). As predicted in the 1940s by futurist Arthur C. Clarke (http://www.clarkefoundation.org/60th/index.php), geostationary orbits are in common use (http://www.satsig.net/sslist.htm) for communication and weather satellites, a scenario now well-known to astroimagers. Deep images of the night sky made with telescopes that follow the stars can also pick up geostationary satellites (http://www.satobs.org/geosats.html) glinting in sunlight still shining far above the Earth's surface. Because they all move with the Earth's rotation against the background of stars, the satellites leave trails that seem to follow a highway across the celestial landscape. For example, in this wide view of the nearly equatorial Orion region (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap030207.html), individual frames were added to create a 10 minute long exposure. It shows Orion's belt stars (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap090210.html) and well-known nebulae (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap070106.html) along with many 2.5 degree long geostationary satellite trails. The frames are from an ingenious movie, featuring the geostationary satellite highway (http://twanight.org/newTWAN/case.asp).


Tomorrow's picture: stellar butterfly

RIDER
21-02-2010, 09:13
Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 February 21
http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1002/ngc2440d_hst.jpg (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1002/ngc2440d_hst_big.jpg)
NGC 2440: Cocoon of a New White Dwarf
Credit: H. Bond (STScI (http://www.stsci.edu/institute/)), R. Ciardullo (PSU (http://www.astro.psu.edu/)), WFPC2 (http://www.stsci.edu/ftp/instrument_news/WFPC2/wfpc2_top.html), HST (http://www.stsci.edu/hst/HST_overview/), NASA (http://www.nasa.gov/) Explanation: Like a butterfly (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Butterfly), a white dwarf star (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap000910.html) begins its life by casting off a cocoon that enclosed its former self. In this analogy, however, the Sun (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap060502.html) would be a caterpillar (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caterpillar) and the ejected shell of gas would become the prettiest of all! In the above cocoon (http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/newsdesk/archive/releases/1999/35/image/e), the planetary nebula (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/planetary_nebulae.html) designated NGC 2440 (http://hubblesite.org/gallery/wallpaper/pr2007009a/), contains one of the hottest white dwarf stars known (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap951130.html). The white dwarf (http://imagine.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/science/know_l2/dwarfs.html) can be seen as the bright dot near the photo's center. Our Sun (http://soi.stanford.edu/press/sun-interview.html) will eventually become a white dwarf (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_dwarf) butterfly but not for another 5 billion years. The above false color image (http://heritage.stsci.edu/1999/38/) was post-processed by Forrest Hamilton (http://heritage.stsci.edu/commonpages/infoindex/ourproject/f_hamilton.html).


Tomorrow's picture: clash of the galaxies

RIDER
22-02-2010, 07:31
Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 February 22
http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1002/hickson31_hst.jpg (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1002/hickson31_hst_big.jpg)
<center> Galaxy Group Hickson 31
Credit: NASA (http://www.nasa.gov/), ESA (http://www.spacetelescope.org/), J. English (http://www.physics.umanitoba.ca/%7Eenglish/) (U. Manitoba (http://www.physics.umanitoba.ca/)), and the Hubble Heritage Team (http://heritage.stsci.edu/commonpages/infoindex/ourproject/moreproject.html) (STScI (http://www.stsci.edu/resources/)/AURA (http://www.aura-astronomy.org/));
Acknowledgement: S. Gallagher (http://www.astro.uwo.ca/%7Esgall/index.html) (U. Western Ontario (http://www.physics.uwo.ca/)) </center> Explanation: Will the result of these galactic collisions be one big elliptical galaxy (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap080213.html)? Quite possibly, but not for another billion (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Future_of_the_Earth) years. Pictured above (http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2010/08/image/a/), several of the dwarf galaxies (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap081229.html) of in the Hickson Compact Group 31 (http://heritage.stsci.edu/2010/08/caption.html) are seen slowly merging. Two of the brighter galaxies are colliding on the far left, while an elongated galaxy (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap990525.html) above is connected to them by an unusual bridge of stars (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap051008.html). Inspection of the above image (http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2010/08/full/) further indicates that the bright duo trail a rope of stars pointing to the spiral galaxy (http://cas.sdss.org/dr6/en/proj/basic/galaxies/spirals.asp) on the far right. Most assuredly, the pictured galaxies of Hickson Compact Group (http://nedwww.ipac.caltech.edu/level5/Sept01/Hickson/Hickson_contents.html) 31 will pass through and destroy each other, millions of stars will form (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap080428.html) and explode, and thousands of nebula will form (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap090803.html) and dissipate before the dust (http://www-ssg.sr.unh.edu/ism/what1.html) settles and the final galaxy emerges about one billion years from now. The above image (http://heritage.stsci.edu/2010/08/index.html) is a composite of images taken in infrared light (http://science.hq.nasa.gov/kids/imagers/ems/infrared.html) by the Spitzer Space Telescope (http://spitzer.caltech.edu/mission/32-The-Mission), ultraviolet light (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ultraviolet) by the GALEX space telescope (http://www.galex.caltech.edu/about/overview.html), and visible light (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visible_spectrum) by the Hubble Space Telescope (http://hubble.nasa.gov/overview/intro.php). Hickson Compact Group 31 spans about 150 thousand light years (http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/cosmic_distance.html) and lies about 150 million light years away toward the constellation of Eridanus (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eridanus_%28constellation%29).

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Tomorrow's picture: shocking launch

monza
24-02-2010, 01:37
[/URL] [URL="http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html"]Discover the cosmos! (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Farchi vepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 February 23
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1002/sdowaves_privon.jpg (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1002/sdowaves_privon_big.jpg)
Exceptional Rocket Waves Destroy Sun Dog
Credit & Copyright: George C. Privon (http://privon.com/about.shtml) (U. Virginia (http://www.astro.virginia.edu/)) Explanation: What created those rocket waves, and why did they destroy that sun dog? Close inspection of the above image (http://www.flickr.com/photos/neurostar/4350258074/in/set-72157623288251657/) shows not only a rocket rising near the center, but unusual air ripples around it and a colorful sundog to the far right. The rocket, carrying the Solar Dynamics Observatory (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_Dynamics_Observatory) (SDO), lifted off two weeks ago from Cape Canaveral (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cape_Canaveral,_Florida), Florida (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Florida), USA (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States) into a cold blue sky. The SDO (http://sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/mission/about.php) is designed to observe the Sun continuously over the next several years, exploring the Sun's atmosphere (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap050216.html) at high resolution and fast time scales. The air ripples -- seen about one minute after launch -- were unexpected, as was the sudden disappearance of the sundog (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap990823.html) after the ripples passed. Noticed (http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2010/18feb_coolmovie.htm) and recorded by several (http://sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/mission/launch/watch.php) onlookers, there has been much speculation about the origin of the ripples. An ongoing discussion about them can be joined here (http://bb.nightskylive.net/asterisk/discuss_apod.php?date=100223) in APOD's discussion board the Asterisk (http://bb.nightskylive.net/asterisk/). A leading hypothesis holds that the ripples resulted from a sonic boom (http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/barrier/boom/answer3.html) created as the rocket broke the sound barrier (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap070819.html), which then jumbled a thin layer of ice crystals (http://www.atoptics.co.uk/halo/dogfm.htm) that were aligned to create the sundog (http://magnoliamanor-network.net/nicci/photogallery/sunning.jpg). Lingering questions (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:The_Thinker_close.jpg) include why other rocket launches (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap081001.html) don't produce air ripples as noticeable, and why the ripples appeared more prominent above the rocket. If you know of images of any other aircraft or spacecraft (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aviation_history) that have produced similar air ripples, please post them to the discussion thread (http://bb.nightskylive.net/asterisk/discuss_apod.php?date=100223) -- they may be help create a better understanding of the effect.


window to earth (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100224.html)

monza
24-02-2010, 12:09
Discover the cosmos! (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Farchi vepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 February 24
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1002/installingcupola_nasa.jpg (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fimage %2F1002%2Finstallingcupola_nasa_big.jpg)
Astronaut Installs Panoramic Space Window
Credit: ISS Expedition 22 Crew (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nasa.gov%2Fmission_pages %2Fstation%2Fexpeditions%2Fexpedition22%2Findex.html), Shuttle Endeavour STS-130 Crew (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nasa.gov%2Fmission_pages %2Fshuttle%2Fshuttlemissions%2Fsts130%2Findex.html), NASA (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nasa.gov%2F) Explanation: This space job was almost complete. Floating just below the International Space Station (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FIn ternational_Space_Station), astronaut Nicholas Patrick (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.jsc.nasa.gov%2FBios%2Fht mlbios%2Fpatrick.html) put some finishing touches (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv% 3DeMMFh8tGpZ8) on the newly installed cupola space windows (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nasa.gov%2Fcenters%2Fken nedy%2Fstationpayloads%2Fcupola.html) last week. Patrick was a mission specialist (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nasa.gov%2Faudience%2Ffo rstudents%2Fpostsecondary%2Ffeatures%2FF_Astronaut_Requireme nts.html) onboard the recently completed space shuttle Endeavor's STS-130 mission (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap100 209.html) to the ISS. Pictured, Patrick floats near the outermost of seven windows on the new cupola (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FCu pola_%2528ISS_module%2529) of the just-installed Tranquility module (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nasa.gov%2Fcenters%2Fken nedy%2Fstationpayloads%2Ftranquility.html). Patrick hovers about 340 kilometers over the Earth (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.heavens-above.com%2Forbitdisplay.asp%3Fsatid%3D25544)'s surface, well in front of the blue sky, blue water (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.scientificamerican.com%2 Farticle.cfm%3Fid%3Dwhy-does-the-ocean-appear), and white clouds pictured far in the background. In the above image (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fspaceflight.nasa.gov%2Fgalle ry%2Fimages%2Fshuttle%2Fsts-130%2Fhtml%2Fiss022e066872.html), covers on windows three (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FTh ree) and four (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2F4_ %2528number%2529%23Evolution_of_the_glyph) were in place and clearly labelled. Images (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fspaceflight.nasa.gov%2Fgalle ry%2Fimages%2Fshuttle%2Fsts-130%2Fhtml%2Fiss022e066963.html) from inside (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fspaceflight.nasa.gov%2Fgalle ry%2Fimages%2Fshuttle%2Fsts-130%2Fhtml%2Fiss022e066964.html) the ISS's (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fspaceflight.nasa.gov%2Fgalle ry%2Fimages%2Fshuttle%2Fsts-130%2Fhtml%2Fs130e010367.html) new panoramic cupola (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fspaceflight.nasa.gov%2Fgalle ry%2Fimages%2Fshuttle%2Fsts-130%2Fhtml%2Fs130e010380.html) are now available (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fspaceflight.nasa.gov%2Fgalle ry%2Fimages%2Fshuttle%2Fsts-130%2Fhtml%2Fs130e010480.html).


eMMFh8tGpZ8
(http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap100 225.html)

monza
25-02-2010, 12:29
Discover the cosmos! (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Farchi vepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 February 25
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1002/ngc891Franke_900.jpg (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fimage %2F1002%2Fngc891Franke.jpg)
Edge-on Spiral Galaxy NGC 891
Credit & Copyright (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Flib%2 Fabout_apod.html%23srapply): Bob Franke (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fbf-astro.com%2F) Explanation: This beautiful cosmic portrait features NGC 891 (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fbf-astro.com%2Fngc891%2Fngc891.htm). The spiral galaxy (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fseds.org%2Fmessier%2FXtra%2F ngc%2Fn0891.html) spans about 100 thousand light-years and is seen almost exactly edge-on from our perspective. In fact, about 30 million light-years distant in the constellation Andromeda, NGC 891 looks (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Farxiv.org%2Fabs%2F1002.0461) a lot like our Milky Way (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap000 130.html). At first glance, it has a flat, thin, galactic disk and (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fcasswww.ucsd.edu%2Fpublic%2F tutorial%2FMW.html) a central bulge cut along the middle by regions of dark obscuring dust (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap090 615.html). Also apparent in NGC 891's ege-on presentation (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap010 510.html) are filaments of dust (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap030 706.html) that extend hundreds of light-years above and below the center line. The dust has likely been blown out of the disk by supernova explosions or intense star formation activity (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap090 205.html). Faint neighboring galaxies can also been seen near this galaxy's disk.



(http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap100 226.html)

monza
26-02-2010, 11:51
Discover the cosmos! (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Farchi vepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 February 26
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1002/ChickenToEta_Willasch900.jpg (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fimage %2F1002%2FChickenToEta_Willasch.jpg)
Chasing Carina
Credit & Copyright (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Flib%2 Fabout_apod.html%23srapply): Dieter Willasch (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.astro-cabinet.com%2F) Explanation: A jewel of the southern sky, the Great Carina Nebula (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap090 216.html), aka NGC 3372, spans over 300 light-years. Near the upper right of this expansive skycape (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.astro-cabinet.com%2Fshowimage.php%3Fimage%3DCarina_180m-Ha_90m_HaRGBfinal.jpg), it is much larger than the more northerly Orion Nebula (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap081 023.html). In fact, the Carina Nebula is one of our galaxy's largest star-forming regions (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap090 524.html) and home to young, extremely massive stars, including the still enigmatic variable Eta Carinae (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap080 617.html), a star with well over 100 times the mass of the Sun. Nebulae near the center of the 10 degree wide field include NGC 3576 (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap080 326.html) and NGC 3603 (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap071 005.html). Near center at the top of the frame is open star cluster NGC 3532 (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.seds.org%2Fmessier%2Fxtr a%2Fngc%2Fn3532.html), the Wishing Well Cluster. More compact, NGC 3766 (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fseds.org%2Fmessier%2Fxtra%2F ngc%2Fn3766.html), the Pearl Cluster, can be spotted at the left. Anchoring the lower left of the cosmic canvas is another large star-forming region, IC 2948 with embedded (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.universetoday.com%2F2008 %2F05%2F05%2Fic-2944-astrophotography-by-ken-crawford%2F) star cluster IC 2944. That region is popularly known (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap080 418.html) as the Running Chicken Nebula (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fseds.org%2F%257Espider%2Fspi der%2FMisc%2Fi2948.html).



(http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap100 227.html)

monza
28-02-2010, 01:56
Discover the cosmos! (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 February 27
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1002/ISSEndeavourFlyby2park600.jpg (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1002/ISSEndeavourFlyby2park.jpg)
Dawn's Endeavour
Credit & Copyright (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/lib/about_apod.html#srapply): Malcolm Park (http://www.cygnusx1.ca/) Explanation: On February 21st, the Space Shuttle Endeavour and the International Space Station (ISS) flew through the sky near dawn over (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap091022.html) Whitby, Ontario, Canada. Along with star trails, both were captured in this single time exposure. Glinting in sunlight 350 kilometers above the Earth, Endeavour (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100209.html) slightly preceeded the ISS arcing over (http://www.heavens-above.com/) the horizon. But the brighter trail and the brighter flare belongs to the space station just visited (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100224.html) by Endeavour. Near the completion of the STS-130 mission (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100213.html), hours later Endeavour made a night landing at Kennedy Space Center.



XcRhWDQZf5Y

RIDER
28-02-2010, 19:45
Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 February 28
http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1002/fermiexclusion_hulet.jpg (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1002/fermiexclusion_hulet_big.jpg)
Pauli Exclusion Principle: Why You Don't Implode
Credit & Copyright: Andrew Truscott & Randall Hulet (http://atomcool.rice.edu/) (Rice U. (http://physics.rice.edu/)) Explanation: Why doesn't matter (http://hepwww.rl.ac.uk/pub/bigbang/file3.html) just bunch up? The same principle that keeps neutron stars (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap030201.html) and white dwarf stars (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap100221.html) from imploding also keeps people from imploding (http://www.physlink.com/Education/AskExperts/ae455.cfm) and makes normal matter (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matter) mostly empty space. The observed reason is known as the Pauli Exclusion Principle (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pauli_exclusion_principle). The principle states that identical fermions (http://pdg.web.cern.ch/pdg/cpep/fermion.html) -- one type of fundamental matter (http://www2.slac.stanford.edu/vvc/theory/fundamental.html) -- cannot be in the same place at the same time and with the same orientation. The other type of matter, bosons (http://www.pa.msu.edu/courses/1997spring/PHY232/lectures/atomic/bosons.html), do not have this property, as demonstrated clearly by recently created Bose-Einstein condensates (http://www.colorado.edu/physics/2000/bec/what_is_it.html). Earlier this decade, the Pauli (http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Wolfgang_Pauli) Exclusion Principle was demonstrated graphically (http://www.aip.org/mgr/png/2001/118.htm) in the above picture (http://www.aip.org/mgr/png/2001/118.htm) of clouds of two isotopes (http://ie.lbl.gov/education/info.htm) of lithium -- the left cloud composed of bosons while the right cloud is composed of fermions (http://www.particleadventure.org/fermibos.html). As temperature (http://eo.ucar.edu/skymath/tmp2.html) drops, the bosons bunch together, while the fermi (http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/physics/laureates/1938/fermi-bio.html)ons better keep their distance. The reason why the Pauli Exclusion Principle (http://galileo.phys.virginia.edu/classes/252/symmetry/Symmetry.html) is true and the physical limits of the principle are still unknown.


Tomorrow's picture: strange streaks

RIDER
01-03-2010, 08:05
Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 March 1
http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1003/streaks_mro.jpg (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1003/streaks_mro_big.jpg)
<center> Slope Streaks in Acheron Fossae on Mars
Credit: HiRISE (http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/), MRO (http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/mro/), LPL (U. Arizona) (http://www.lpl.arizona.edu/), NASA (http://www.nasa.gov/) </center> Explanation: What creates these picturesque dark streaks on Mars? No one knows for sure. A leading hypothesis is that streaks like these are caused by fine grained sand sliding (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap100119.html) down the banks of troughs and craters. Pictured above (http://www.uahirise.org/PSP_001656_2175), dark sand appears to have flowed hundreds of meters down the slopes of Acheron Fossae (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Acheron_Fossae.jpg). The sand appears to flow like a liquid around boulders, and, for some reason, lightens significantly over time. This sand flow process (http://www.uahirise.org/science_themes/mass.php) is one of several which can rapidly change the surface of Mars, with other processes including dust devils (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap050426.html), dust storms (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap011017.html), and the freezing and melting (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap070805.html) of areas of ice. The above image (http://www.uahirise.org/PSP_001656_2175) was taken by the HiRise (http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/HiBlog/) camera on board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/MRO/mission/index.html) which has been orbiting Mars since 2006. Acheron Fossae (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acheron_Fossae) is a 700 kilometer long trough (http://hirise-pds.lpl.arizona.edu/PDS/EXTRAS/RDR/PSP/ORB_001600_001699/PSP_001656_2175/PSP_001656_2175_RED.abrowse.jpg) in the Diacria quadrangle (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diacria_quadrangle) of Mars.

<script type="text/javascript"> digg_url = 'http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100301.html'; digg_skin = 'compact'; </script> <script src="http://digg.com/tools/diggthis.js" type="text/javascript"></script><iframe src="http://digg.com/tools/diggthis.php?u=http%3A//apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100301.html&s=compact&t=Astronomy%20Picture%20of%20the%20Day" width="120" frameborder="0" height="18" scrolling="no"></iframe>
Tomorrow's picture: open space

monza
03-03-2010, 13:28
Discover the cosmos! (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Farchi vepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 March 2
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1003/m78_torregrosa.jpg (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fimage %2F1003%2Fm78_torregrosa_big.jpg)
M78 and Reflecting Dust Clouds in Orion
Credit & Copyright (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Ficueva.wordpress.com%2Fcopyr ight-2%2F): Ignacio de la Cueva Torregrosa Explanation: An eerie blue glow and ominous columns of dark dust highlight M78 and other bright reflection nebula (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Frefle ction_nebulae.html) in the constellation of Orion (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.astro.wisc.edu%2F%257Edo lan%2Fconstellations%2Fconstellations%2FOrion.html). The dark filamentary dust (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap030 706.html) not only absorbs light, but also reflects the light of several bright blue stars that formed recently (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fadsabs.harvard.edu%2Fabs%2F1 975ApJ...196..489S) in the nebula. Of the two reflection nebulas pictured above (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Ficueva.wordpress.com%2F2010% 2F02%2F03%2Fngc-2068-2071%2F), the more famous nebula is M78 (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap091 126.html), in the image center, while NGC 2071 can be seen to its lower left. The same type of scattering that colors the daytime sky (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fmath.ucr.edu%2Fhome%2Fbaez%2 Fphysics%2FGeneral%2FBlueSky%2Fblue_sky.html) further enhances the blue color. M78 (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.seds.org%2Fmessier%2Fm%2 Fm078.html) is about five light-years (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.glyphweb.com%2Fesky%2Fco ncepts%2Flightyear.html) across and visible through a small telescope. M78 appears above (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Ficueva.wordpress.com%2F2010% 2F02%2F03%2Fngc-2068-2071%2F) only as it was 1600 years ago (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2F41 0), however, because that is how long it takes light to go from there (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fadsbit.harvard.edu%2Fcgi-bin%2Fnph-iarticle_query%3F1975ApJ...195L..23B) to here. M78 (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FMe ssier_78) belongs to the larger Orion (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap971 201.html) Molecular (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap090 929.html) Cloud (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap090 211.html) Complex (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap070 125.html) that contains the Great Nebula in Orion (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap040 927.html) and the Horsehead Nebula (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap070 527.html).



(http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap100 303.html)

monza
03-03-2010, 13:31
Discover the cosmos! (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Farchi vepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 March 3
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1003/iss_sts130.jpg (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fimage %2F1003%2Fiss_sts130_big.jpg)
The International Space Station from Above
Credit: STS-130 Crew (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nasa.gov%2Fmission_pages %2Fshuttle%2Fshuttlemissions%2Fsts130%2Fmain%2Findex.html), NASA (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nasa.gov%2F) Explanation: The International Space Station (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nasa.gov%2Fmission_pages %2Fstation%2Fmain%2Findex.html) (ISS) is the largest human-made object ever to orbit the Earth (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap070 325.html). The ISS is so large that it can be seen drifting overhead with the unaided eye (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwebphysics.davidson.edu%2Fph yslet_resources%2Fdav_optics%2Fexamples%2Feye_demo.html), and is frequently (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap090 410.html) imaged (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap090 206.html) from (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap090 116.html) the (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap080 730.html) ground (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap080 604.html) in (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap100 227.html) picturesque (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap080 524.html) fashion (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap061 014.html). Last month, the station was visited (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap100 224.html) again by space shuttle (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap100 216.html), which resupplied the station and added a new module (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nasa.gov%2Fcenters%2Fken nedy%2Fstationpayloads%2Ftranquility.html). The ISS (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FIn ternational_Space_Station) is currently operated by the Expedition 22 crew (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FEx pedition_22), now consisting five astronauts including two supplied by USA's NASA (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nasa.gov%2F), two by Russia's RKA (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.roscosmos.ru%2Fmain.php% 3Flang%3Den), and one by Japan's JAXA (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.jaxa.jp%2Findex_e.html). After departing the ISS (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nasa.gov%2Fmission_pages %2Fstation%2Fmain%2Findex.html), the crew of the space shuttle Endeavour captured the above spectacular vista (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fspaceflight.nasa.gov%2Fgalle ry%2Fimages%2Fshuttle%2Fsts-130%2Fhtml%2Fs130e012312.html) of the orbiting space city (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fspaceflight.nasa.gov%2Fstati on%2Fisstodate.html) high above the clouds, waters, and lands of Earth. Visible components include modules (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fspaceflight.nasa.gov%2Fgalle ry%2Fimages%2Fstation%2Fassembly%2Fndxpage1.html), truss (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap021 217.html)es, and expansive solar arrays (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap981 210.html) that gather sunlight that is turned into needed electricity (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FEl ectricity).

[/URL]
[URL="http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap100 304.html"]
(http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fsharer.ph p%3Fu%3Dhttp%253A%252F%252Fantwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov%252Fapod%252 Fap100303.html%26src%3Dsp)

monza
04-03-2010, 12:14
Discover the cosmos! (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Farchi vepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 March 4
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1003/NGC4565_hager900.jpg (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fimage %2F1003%2FNGC4565_hager.jpg)
NGC 4565: Galaxy on Edge
Image Credit & Copyright (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Flib%2 Fabout_apod.html%23srapply): Acquisition - Torsten Grossmann, Processing - Dietmar Hager (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.stargazer-observatory.com%2F) Explanation: Magnificent spiral galaxy NGC 4565 (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.seds.org%2Fmessier%2Fxtr a%2Fngc%2Fn4565.html) is viewed edge-on from planet Earth. Also known as the Needle Galaxy (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap990 617.html) for its narrow profile, bright NGC 4565 is a stop on many telescopic tours of the northern sky, in the faint but well-groomed constellation Coma Berenices (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.dibonsmith.com%2Fcom_con .htm). This sharp, colorful image (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.stargazer-observatory.com%2F4565-ag.html) reveals the galaxy's bulging central core cut by obscuring dust lanes (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap070 729.html) that lace NGC 4565's thin galactic plane (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap100 225.html.html). An assortment of other galaxies are included in the pretty field of view. Neighboring galaxy NGC 4562 is at the upper right. NGC 4565 itself lies about 40 million light-years (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fchandra.harvard.edu%2Fphoto% 2Fcosmic_distance.html) distant, spanning some 100,000 light-years. Easily spotted with small telescopes, sky enthusiasts (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.cloudynights.com%2Fitem. php%3Fitem_id%3D1059) consider NGC 4565 (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.noao.edu%2Foutreach%2Fao p%2Fobservers%2Fn4565.html) to be a prominent celestial masterpiece Messier missed (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap080 419.html).


(http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap100 305.html)

RIDER
05-03-2010, 08:11
<center> Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 March 5
http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1003/AurTezelV2800.jpg (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1003/AurTezelV2.jpg)
</center> <center> Deep Auriga
Image Credit & Copyright (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/lib/about_apod.html#srapply): Tunç Tezel (http://www.twanight.org/newTWAN/photographers_about.asp?photographer=Tunc%20Tezel) (TWAN (http://www.twanight.org/)) </center> Explanation: The plane of our Milky Way Galaxy runs right through Auriga (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Auriga_%28constellation%29), the Charioteer (http://www.ancient-greece.org/art/chiarioteer.html). A good part of the ancient northern constellation's rich collection of nebulae and star clusters is featured in this expansive, 10 degree wide skyscape. Bright star Elnath (http://stars.astro.illinois.edu/sow/elnath.html) lies near the bottom right, linking Auriga to another constellation, Taurus, the Bull. Three open star clusters, Charles Messier's M36 (http://www.perezmedia.net/beltofvenus/archives/000358.html), M37 (http://www.skyledge.net/Messier37.htm), and M38 (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap030107.html) line up in the dense star field above and left of Elnath, familiar to many binocular-equiped skygazers. But the deep exposure also brings out the reddish emission nebulae of star-forming regions IC 405 (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap090126.html), IC 410 (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap060815.html), and IC 417 (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap100113.html). E. E. Barnard's dark nebulae (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap090425.html) B34 and B226 just stand out against a brighter background. For help identifying even more of Auriga's deep sky highlights, put your cursor over the image.

<script type="text/javascript"> digg_url = 'http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100305.html'; digg_skin = 'compact'; </script> <script src="http://digg.com/tools/diggthis.js" type="text/javascript"></script><iframe src="http://digg.com/tools/diggthis.php?u=http%3A//apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100305.html&s=compact&t=Astronomy%20Picture%20of%20the%20Day" width="120" frameborder="0" height="18" scrolling="no"></iframe>
Tomorrow's picture: pixels in space

monza
07-03-2010, 02:16
Discover the cosmos! (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Farchi vepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 March 6
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1003/wirosunpillar_alquist900.jpg (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fimage %2F1003%2Fwirosunpillar_alquist.jpg)
Pillar at Sunset
Image Credit & Copyright (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Flib%2 Fabout_apod.html%23srapply): David Alquist Explanation: Reddened light (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.webexhibits.org%2Fcauses ofcolor%2F14B.html) from the setting Sun illuminates the cloud banks hugging this snowy, rugged terrain. Inspiring a moment of quiet contemplation, the sunset (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap080 531.html) scene included a remarkable pillar of light that seemed to connect the clouds in the sky with the mountains below. Known as a Sun pillar (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.atoptics.co.uk%2Fhalo%2F pillar.htm), the luminous column was produced by sunlight reflecting from flat, six-sided (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap061 109.html) ice crystals formed high in the cold atmosphere and fluttering toward the ground. Last Monday, astronomers watched (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap050 127.html) this Sun pillar slowly fade, as the twilight deepened (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap050 611.html) and clearing, dark skies came to Mt. Jelm and the Wyoming Infrared Observatory (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap030 313.html).



(http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap100 307.html)

RIDER
07-03-2010, 09:27
Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 March 7
http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1003/art_spirit.jpg (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1003/art_spirit_big.jpg)
Spirit Rover at Engineering Flats on Mars
Credit: Mars Exploration Rover Mission (http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/home/index.html), JPL (http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/), NASA (http://www.nasa.gov/home/) Explanation: Is it art? If so, the paintbrush was the Spirit robotic rover (http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/overview/), the canvas was the soil on Mars (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/3519998.stm), and the artists (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap030315.html) were the scientists and engineers (http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/people/) of the Mars Exploration Rover Mission. This panoramic picture (http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA06870), created in 2004 and shown above compressed horizontally, was mostly unintentional -- the MERS (http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/overview/) team was primarily instructing Spirit to investigate rocks in and around Hank's Hollow (http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/missions/mer/images.cfm?id=670) in a location called Engineering Flats (http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/missions/mer/images.cfm?id=683) on Mars. After creating the ground display with its treads, the Spirit (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap040104.html) rover was instructed to photograph the area along with itself in shadow (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap040803.html). In 2010 as winter approaches in northern Mars, Spirit, still mired in sand, has been placed in an energy saving "hibernating" mode (http://marsrovers.nasa.gov/mission/status_spiritAll.html) until spring arrives and more direct sunlight might be used to power the robotic explorer.

Tomorrow's picture: see mars

monza
08-03-2010, 17:05
Discover the cosmos! (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Farchi vepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 March 8
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1003/allalinmars_credner_plain.jpg (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fimage %2F1003%2Fallalinmars_credner_plain.jpg)
Mars Over the Allalinhorn
Credit & Copyright: Till Credner (AlltheSky.com (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.allthesky.com%2Fgallery. html)) Explanation: What's that bright object in the sky? A common question with answers that vary by time and season (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.jodrellbank.manchester.a c.uk%2Fastronomy%2Fnightsky%2F), the quick answer just after sunset in middle of last month, from the northern hemisphere, was Mars. The above picturesque panorama (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.allthesky.de%2Fnightscap es%2Fallalin.html), taken during a ski trip from the Alps (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FAl ps) in Switzerland (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FSw itzerland), shows not only Mars (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap071 225.html), but much more. Pine trees (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FPi ne_trees) line the foreground, while numerous slopes (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv% 3D05uBgnTAgp8) leading up to the snow covered Allalinhorn (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.summitpost.org%2Fmountai n%2Frock%2F150292%2Fallalinhorn.html) mountain are visible in the distance (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv% 3Dlpwkw4dZEx4). Stars dot the background, with the Beehive star cluster (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap040 617.html) (M44) visible just below and to the left of Mars, while stars Castor (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fstars.astro.illinois.edu%2Fs ow%2Fcastor.html) and Pollux (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fstars.astro.illinois.edu%2Fs ow%2Fpollux.html) peek through the tree tops to the Mars' upper right. Mars will remain bright and in the constellation of the Crab (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.ianridpath.com%2Fstartal es%2Fcancer.htm) (Cancer) until mid-May.

05uBgnTAgp8

lpwkw4dZEx4

monza
09-03-2010, 12:15
Discover the cosmos! (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Farchi vepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 March 9
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1003/heartmaffei_wise.jpg (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fimage %2F1003%2Fheartmaffei_wise_big.jpg)
Galaxies Beyond the Heart: Maffei 1 and 2
Credit: NASA (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nasa.gov%2F), JPL-Caltech (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.jpl.nasa.gov%2F), WISE (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwise.ssl.berkeley.edu%2F) Team Explanation: The two galaxies on the far left were unknown until 1968. Although they would have appeared as two of the brighter galaxies on the night sky, the opaque dust of the central band (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap070 930.html) of our Milky Way Galaxy (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fplanetquest.jpl.nasa.gov%2Fm ilky-way%2Fmilky_way.html) had obscured (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap000 109.html) them from being seen in visible light. The above image (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwise.ssl.berkeley.edu%2Fgall ery_Maffei_1_2.html) in infrared light (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fscience.hq.nasa.gov%2Fkids%2 Fimagers%2Fems%2Finfrared.html) taken by the recently launched Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwise.ssl.berkeley.edu%2Fmiss ion.html) (WISE (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv% 3D8QtyB-TdlSc)), however, finds these galaxies in great detail (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fadsabs.harvard.edu%2Fabs%2F2 005PASP..117..589D) far behind -- but seemingly next to -- the photogenic Heart nebula (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap090 214.html) (IC 1805). The spiral galaxy (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap080 622.html) near the top is the easiest to spot and is known as Maffei 2 (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FMa ffei_2). Just below and to its right is fuzzy-looking Maffei 1 (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FMa ffei_1), the closest giant elliptical galaxy (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fellip tical_galaxies.html) to Earth. The above false-colored image (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwise.ssl.berkeley.edu%2Fgall ery_Maffei_1_2.html) spans three full moon (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap080 801.html)s from top to bottom. The Maffei (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FPa olo_Maffei) galaxies each span about 15,000 light years across and lie about 10 million light years (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fchandra.harvard.edu%2Fphoto% 2Fcosmic_distance.html) away toward the constellation (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FCa ssiopeia_%2528constellation%2529) of the Queen of Ethiopia (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FEt hiopia_%2528mythology%2529) (Cassiopeia). On the image right, stars, gaseous filaments, and warm dust (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fnedwww.ipac.caltech.edu%2Fle vel5%2FMathis%2FMathis1.html) highlight a detailed infrared view (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv% 3DSJ-8yFgWt-c) of the Heart nebula (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap080 914.html).

SJ-8yFgWt-c
(http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap100 310.html)

monza
10-03-2010, 14:30
Discover the cosmos! (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Farchi vepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 March 10
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1003/helene2_cassini.jpg (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fimage %2F1003%2Fhelene2_cassini_big.jpg)
Saturn's Moon Helene from Cassini
Credit: NASA (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nasa.gov%2F)/JPL (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.jpl.nasa.gov%2F)/SSI (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fciclops.org%2F) Explanation: What's happening on the surface of Saturn's moon Helene? The moon was imaged (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fciclops.org%2Fview_event%2F1 31%2FHelene_Rev127_Flyby_Raw_Preview) in unprecedented detail (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fsaturn.jpl.nasa.gov%2Fphotos %2Fraw%2F%3Fstart%3D8%26storedQ%3D2206587) last week as the robotic Cassini spacecraft (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fsaturn.jpl.nasa.gov%2Fspacec raft%2Foverview%2F) orbiting Saturn swooped (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv% 3DSP1fnh4vsKQ) to within two Earth diameters of the diminutive moon. Although conventional craters and hills appear, the above raw and unprocessed image (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fsaturn.jpl.nasa.gov%2Fmultim edia%2Fimages%2Fraw%2FcasJPGFullS58%2FN00152249.jpg) also shows (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nasa.gov%2Fmission_pages %2Fcassini%2Fwhycassini%2Fcassini20100308.html) terrain that appears unusually smooth and streaked (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.planetary.org%2Fblog%2Fa rticle%2F00002376%2F). Planetary astronomers will be inspecting these detailed images of Helene (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FHe lene_%2528moon%2529) to glean clues about the origin and evolution of the 30-km across floating iceberg. Helene (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap951 010.html) is also unusual because it circles Saturn just ahead of the large moon Dione (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap070 801.html), making it one of only four known moons to occupy a gravitational well known as a stable Lagrange point (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FLa grange_point).

SP1fnh4vsKQ

RIDER
13-03-2010, 10:38
Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 March 13
http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1003/centaurusA_carruthers_c900.jpg (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1003/centaurusA_carruthers.jpg)
Centaurus A
Image Credit & Copyright (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/lib/about_apod.html#srapply): Tim Carruthers (http://astrophoto.com.au/) Explanation: Only 11 million light-years away, Centaurus (http://www.rasnz.org.nz/Stars/Centaurus.htm) A is the closest active galaxy (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Active_galactic_nucleus) to planet Earth. Spanning over 60,000 light-years, the peculiar elliptical galaxy, also known as NGC 5128 (http://seds.org/messier/Xtra/ngc/n5128.html), is featured in this sharp color image. Centaurus A is (http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/1998/14/text/) apparently the result of a collision (http://burro.cwru.edu/JavaLab/GalCrashWeb/) of two otherwise normal galaxies resulting in a fantastic jumble of star clusters and imposing dark dust lanes. Near the galaxy's center (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap060304.html), left over cosmic debris is steadily being consumed by a central black hole with a billion times the mass of the Sun. As in other active galaxies, that process likely generates the radio, X-ray, and gamma-ray energy radiated (http://www.obspm.fr/actual/nouvelle/mar09/cena.en.shtml) by Centaurus A (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap080110.html).

Tomorrow's picture: binary black hole

RIDER
14-03-2010, 10:56
Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 March 14
http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1003/3c75_chandra.jpg (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1003/3c75_chandra_big.jpg)
<center> Binary Black Hole in 3C 75
Credit: X-Ray: NASA (http://www.nasa.gov/) / CXC (http://chandra.harvard.edu/) / D. Hudson, T. Reiprich et al. (http://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0603272) (AIfA (http://www.astro.uni-bonn.de/%7Ewebiaef/));
Radio: NRAO / VLA/ (http://www.vla.nrao.edu/) NRL (http://www.nrl.navy.mil/) </center> Explanation: What's happening in the middle of this massive galaxy? There, two bright sources at the center of this composite x-ray (http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2006/a400/) (blue)/radio (http://science.hq.nasa.gov/kids/imagers/ems/radio.html) (pink) image are thought to be co-orbiting supermassive black holes powering the giant radio source 3C 75 (http://images.nrao.edu/object/index.php?id=30). Surrounded by multimillion degree x-ray emitting gas, and blasting out jets (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap020226.html) of relativistic particles the supermassive black holes (http://csep10.phys.utk.edu/astr162/lect/active/smblack.html) are separated by 25,000 light-years. At the cores of two merging galaxies in the Abell (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Ogden_Abell) 400 galaxy cluster they are some 300 million light-years away. Astronomers conclude (http://chandra.harvard.edu/press/06_releases/press_040606.html) that these two supermassive black holes (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/htmltest/rjn_bht.html) are bound together by gravity in a binary system in part because (http://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0603272) the jets' consistent swept back appearance is most likely due to their common motion as they speed through the hot cluster gas (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap080823.html) at 1200 kilometers per second. Such spectacular cosmic mergers are thought to be common in crowded galaxy cluster (http://chandra.harvard.edu/xray_sources/galaxy_clusters.html) environments in the distant universe. In their final stages the mergers are expected to be intense sources of gravitational waves (http://archive.ncsa.uiuc.edu/Cyberia/NumRel/GravWaves.html).

Tomorrow's picture: not rays

RIDER
15-03-2010, 06:43
Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 March 15
http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1003/cloudtrails_kotsiopoulos.jpg (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1003/cloudtrails_kotsiopoulos_big.jpg)
Illuminated Cloud Trails Above Greece
Credit & Copyright: Chris Kotsiopoulos (%20chriskots%20at%20gmail%20dot%20com) Explanation: It may appear to be day, but it's night. Those wondrous orange streaks may appear to be rays (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap081116.html) from the setting Sun, but they're actually thin clouds illuminated by the Moon (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap070203.html) as they quickly streaked toward the distant horizon. The thick clouds on the far left may appear to have many layers, but actually they are just a few simple clouds (http://www.ems.psu.edu/%7Efraser/Bad/BadFAQ/BadCloudsFAQ.html) captured on numerous separate exposures. What is surely true, though, is that the above time lapse image sequence (http://www.greeksky.gr/files/photos/landscapes/20100228Trails2.htm) was taken over two hours, about two weeks ago, in Sounio (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sounion), Greece (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greece). Also, those really are star trails swirling around the north star Polaris (http://stars.astro.illinois.edu/sow/polaris.html) on the upper right of the image. But what about the building in the foreground? It may appear to be a famous ancient structure (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap081221.html), but it's actually a small deserted church built only last century.

Tomorrow's picture: detailed corona

monza
15-03-2010, 15:42
Discover the cosmos! (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Farchi vepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 March 11
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1003/AuroraTrails_takasaka900.jpg (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fimage %2F1003%2FAuroraTrails_takasaka.jpg)
Yukon Aurora with Star Trails
Image Credit & Copyright (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Flib%2 Fabout_apod.html%23srapply): Yuichi Takasaka (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.twanight.org%2FnewTWAN%2 Fphotographers_about.asp%3Fphotographer%3DYuichi%2520Takasak a) / TWAN (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.twanight.org%2F) / www.blue-moon.ca (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.blue-moon.ca%2F) Explanation: Fixed to a tripod, a camera can record graceful trails traced by stars (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap100 212.html) as planet Earth rotates (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap070 519.html) on its axis. But at high latitudes during March (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fspaceweather.com%2Faurora%2F gallery_01mar10.htm) and April, it can also capture an aurora shimmering (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap091 219.html) in the night. In fact, the weeks surrounding the equinox, in both spring and fall, offer a favorable season for aurora hunters (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fscience.nasa.gov%2Fheadlines %2Fy2008%2F20mar_spring.htm). The possibilities are demonstrated in this beautiful moonlit vista from northwestern Canadian territory the Yukon. It was taken during the early morning of March 1, off the Klondike Highway (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FKl ondike_Highway) about 60 kilometers south of Dawson City. To compose the picture, many short exposures were digitally combined to follow the concentric star trail arcs while including the greenish auroral curtains also known as the northern lights (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.phy6.org%2Foutreach%2Fed u%2Faurora.htm).

Tomorrow's picture: in the mirror (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap100 312.html)

monza
15-03-2010, 15:44
Discover the cosmos! (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Farchi vepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 March 12
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1003/XRCF1_smith900.jpg (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fimage %2F1003%2FXRCF1_smith.jpg)
JWST: Mirrors and Masked Men
Image Courtesy: Ball Aerospace (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.ballaerospace.com%2F) Explanation: Who are these masked men? Technicians from Ball Aerospace and NASA at Marshall Space Flight Center's (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nasa.gov%2Fcenters%2Fmar shall%2Fhome%2Findex.html) X-ray and Cryogenic Facility, of course, testing primary mirror segments (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nasa.gov%2Fcenters%2Fgod dard%2Fnews%2Ftopstory%2F2010%2F10-003.html) of the James Webb Space Telescope (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.jwst.nasa.gov%2F) (JWST). Scheduled for launch in 2014, JWST will be (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.flickr.com%2Fphotos%2Fgs fc%2Fsets%2F72157623037106357%2F) optimized for the infrared exploration (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.jwst.nasa.gov%2Fscience. html) of the early Universe, utilizing a primary mirror 21.3 feet across, composed of 18 hexagonal segments. Here, a group of JWST mirror segments are being prepared for tests to assure they meet the exacting mission requirements. The technicians' suits and masks help prevent contamination of the mirror surfaces. At the Marshall X-ray and Cryogenic Facility, the mirrors are tested (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv% 3D8gmyKRvkaqI) in the large circular chamber after evacuating the air and cooling the chamber to -400 degrees Fahrenheit (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FFa hrenheit) (only 60 degrees above absolute zero). The extremely low pressure and temperature simulate the JWST (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.jwst.nasa.gov%2Fobservat ory.html) mirror operating environment in space. JWST mirror segment testing will continue for the next 18 months.

8gmyKRvkaqI
(http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap100 313.html)

RIDER
17-03-2010, 05:31
Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 March 16
http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1003/corona_druckmuller.jpg (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1003/corona_druckmuller_big.png)
Detailed View of a Solar Eclipse Corona
Credit & Copyright: Miloslav Druckmüller (http://www.zam.fme.vutbr.cz/%7Edruck/Index.htm) (Brno University of Technology (http://www.vutbr.cz/?set_lang=1)), Martin Dietzel, Peter Aniol, Vojtech Rušin Explanation: Only in the fleeting darkness of a total solar eclipse is the light of the solar corona easily visible. Normally overwhelmed by the bright solar disk, the expansive corona (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap010408.html), the sun's outer atmosphere (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corona), is an alluring sight. But the subtle details and extreme ranges (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap080920.html) in the corona's brightness, although discernible to the eye, are notoriously difficult to photograph. Pictured above (http://www.zam.fme.vutbr.cz/%7Edruck/Eclipse/Ecl2008m/Tse2008_1250_e_hr/0-info.htm), however, using multiple images and digital processing, is a detailed image of the Sun's corona taken during the 2008 August total (http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/SEmono/TSE2008/TSE2008.html) solar eclipse from Mongolia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mongolia). Clearly visible are intricate layers and glowing caustics of an ever changing mixture of hot gas and magnetic fields. Bright looping prominences (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap090531.html) appear pink just above the Sun's limb. The next total solar eclipse (http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/SEmono/TSE2010/TSE2010.html) will be in July but will only be visible in a thin swath of Earth crossing the southern Pacific Ocean (https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/zn.html) and South America (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_America).

Tomorrow's picture: mars phobos

MIKAME
20-03-2010, 21:39
http://i39.tinypic.com/v3hbo3.jpg

video (http://www.ansa.it/web/notizie/videogallery/contributi/2010/03/17/visualizza_new.html_1734067049.html)

monza
23-03-2010, 13:09
Discover the cosmos! (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Farchi vepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 March 17
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1003/phobos1_marsexpress.jpg (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fimage %2F1003%2Fphobos1_marsexpress_big.jpg)
Phobos from Mars Express
Credit: G. Neukum (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.esa.int%2FesaSC%2FSEMGQO XLDMD_people_0_iv.html) (FU Berlin (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.fu-berlin.de%2F)) et al., Mars Express (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.esa.int%2Fexport%2FSPECI ALS%2FMars_Express%2FSEMVQ95V9ED_0.html), DLR (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.dlr.de%2Fpf), ESA (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.esa.int%2F) Explanation: Why is this small object orbiting Mars? The origin of Phobos (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FPh obos_%2528moon%2529), the larger of the two moons orbiting Mars, remains unknown. Phobos (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap080 414.html) and Deimos (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap090 316.html) appear very similar to C-type asteroids (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FC-type_asteroid), yet gravitationally capturing (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fadsabs.harvard.edu%2Fabs%2F1 983AJ.....88.1537H) such asteroids, circularizing their orbits, and dragging them into Mars' equatorial plane seems unlikely. Pictured above (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.esa.int%2FesaSC%2FSEMK17 CKP6G_index_1.html%23subhead3) is Phobos as it appeared during last week's flyby (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv% 3DQYfzTS43oDI) of ESA (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.esa.int%2F)'s Mars Express (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.esa.int%2FSPECIALS%2FMar s_Express%2F), a robotic spacecraft that began orbiting Mars (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv% 3DSrbYqS0UrA4) in 2003. Visible (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.esa.int%2FesaSC%2FSEMK17 CKP6G_index_0.html) in great detail is Phobos' irregular shape (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fplanetary.org%2Fblog%2Fartic le%2F00001348), strangely dark terrain, numerous unusual grooves, and a spectacular chain of craters crossing the image center. Phobos (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.planetary.org%2Fimage%2F phobos_hrsc_layout_20080416.png) spans only about 25 kilometers in length and does not have enough gravity to compress it into a ball. Phobos (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fsci.esa.int%2Fscience-e%2Fwww%2Fobject%2Findex.cfm%3Ffobjectid%3D46442) orbits so close to Mars that sometime in the next 20 million years, tidal deceleration (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FTi dal_acceleration) will break up the rubble moon (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwebservices.esa.int%2Fblog%2 Fblog%2F7) into a ring whose pieces will slowly spiral down and crash (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap090 705.html) onto the red planet. The Russian mission Phobos-Grunt (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FPh obos-Grunt) is scheduled to launch and land on Phobos (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.esa.int%2FesaSC%2FSEMK17 CKP6G_index_1.html%23subhead2) next year.

QYfzTS43oDI

SrbYqS0UrA4


(http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap100 318.html)

monza
23-03-2010, 13:16
Discover the cosmos! (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Farchi vepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 March 18
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1003/Fermi1FGLsky.jpg (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fimage %2F1003%2FFermi1FGLsources.jpg)
Fermi Catalogs the Gamma-ray Sky
Credit: NASA (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nasa.gov%2Fmission_pages %2FGLAST%2Fmain%2Findex.html), DOE (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.energy.gov%2F), International Fermi LAT Collaboration (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww-glast.stanford.edu%2F) Explanation: What shines (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nasa.gov%2Fmission_pages %2FGLAST%2Fmain%2Findex.html) in the gamma-ray sky? The most complete answer yet to that question is offered by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope's first all-sky catalog (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Farxiv.org%2Fabs%2F1002.2280) . Fermi's sources (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Ffermisky.blogspot.com%2F) of cosmic gamma-rays feature (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nasa.gov%2Fmission_pages %2FGLAST%2Fscience%2Findex.html) nature's most energetic particle accelerators (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv% 3Dj50ZssEojtM), ultimately producing 100 MeV to 100 GeV photons, photons with more than 50 million to 50 billion times the energy of visible light (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fscience.hq.nasa.gov%2Fkids%2 Fimagers%2Fems%2Fgamma.html). Distilled from 11 months of sky survey data using Fermi's Large Area Telescope (LAT), the 1,451 cataloged sources include energetic star burst galaxies (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nasa.gov%2Fmission_pages %2FGLAST%2Fnews%2Fstar_factories.html) and active galactic nuclei (AGN) far beyond (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nasa.gov%2Fmission_pages %2FGLAST%2Fnews%2Fgamma-ray-dragons.html) the Milky Way. But within our own galaxy are many pulsars (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap090 709.html) (PSR) and pulsar wind (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap081 227.html) nebulae (PWN), supernova remnants (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nasa.gov%2Fmission_pages %2FGLAST%2Fnews%2Fcosmic-rays-source.html) (SNR), x-ray binary stars (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fchandra.harvard.edu%2Fxray_s ources%2Fneutron_stars.html) (HXB) and micro-quasars (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fchandra.harvard.edu%2Fphoto% 2F2009%2Fg1915%2F) (MQO). Fermi's all sky map is shown centered on the Milky Way with the diffuse gamma-ray emission from the Galactic plane running horizontally through the frame. To locate the cataloged gamma-ray sources, just slide your cursor over the map. For now, 630 of the sources cataloged (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Ffermi.gsfc.nasa.gov%2Fssc%2F data%2Faccess%2Flat%2F1yr_catalog%2F) at gamma-ray energies remain otherwise unidentified, not associated with sources detected at lower energies.

j50ZssEojtM

monza
23-03-2010, 13:17
Discover the cosmos! (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Farchi vepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 March 19
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1003/mb_2010-03-10_SeaGullThor900.jpg (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fimage %2F1003%2Fmb_2010-03-10_SeaGullThor.jpg)
The Seagull and the Duck
Image Credit & Copyright (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Flib%2 Fabout_apod.html%23srapply): Rogelio Bernal Andreo (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fblog.deepskycolors.com%2Fabo ut.html) (Deep Sky Colors) Explanation: Seen as a seagull and a duck, these nebulae are not the only cosmic clouds (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap080 719.html) to evoke images (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap090 910.html) of flight. But both are winging their way across this broad celestial landscape, spanning almost 7 degrees across planet Earth's night sky (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.twanight.org%2F) toward the constellation Canis Major (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.knoxvilleobservers.org%2 Fdsonline%2Fwinter%2Fcanishead.html). The expansive Seagull (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap090 327.html) (upper left) is itself composed of two major cataloged emission nebulae (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap050 930.html). Brighter NGC 2327 forms the head with the more diffuse IC 2177 as the wings and body. Impressively, the Seagull's wingspan would correspond to about 250 light-years at an estimated distance of 3,800 light-years. At the lower right, the Duck appears much more compact and would span only about 50 light-years given its 15,000 light-year distance estimate. Blown by energetic winds from an extremely massive, hot star near its center, the Duck nebula is cataloged as NGC 2359 (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fseds.org%2F%257Espider%2Fngc %2Fngc.cgi%3F2359). Of course, the Duck's thick body and winged appendages also lend it a more dramatic popular moniker -- Thor's Helmet (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap080 117.html).


(http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap100 320.html)

monza
23-03-2010, 13:23
Discover the cosmos! (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Farchi vepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 March 20
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1003/01_zodiacal_lactea_DLopez600h.jpg (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fimage %2F1003%2F01_zodiacal_lactea_DLopez.jpg)
Zodiacal Light Vs. Milky Way
Image Credit & Copyright (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Flib%2 Fabout_apod.html%23srapply): Daniel López Explanation: Ghostly Zodiacal (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.atoptics.co.uk%2Fhighsky %2Fzod1.htm) light, featured near the center (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fimage %2F1003%2F02_zodiacal_lactea_name_DLopez800h.jpg) of this remarkable panorama, is produced as sunlight is scattered by dust in the Solar System's ecliptic plane (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap050 503.html). In the weeks surrounding the March equinox (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap090 924.html) (today at 1732 UT (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Feclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov%2FSEhe lp%2FTimeZone.html)) Zodiacal light is more prominent after sunset in the northern hemisphere, and before sunrise in the south, when the ecliptic makes a steep angle with the horizon. In the picture, the narrow triangle of Zodiacal light extends above the western horizon and seems to end at the lovely Pleiades star cluster (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fheliophysics.org%2Fheadlines %2Fy2010%2F19mar_equinox.htm). Arcing above the Pleiades are stars and nebulae along the plane (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap091 225.html) of our Milky Way Galaxy. Recorded on March 10 from Teide National Park (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap100 212.html) on the island of Tenerife, the vista is composed of 4 separate pictures spanning over 180 degrees.


(http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap100 321.html)

monza
23-03-2010, 13:26
Discover the cosmos! (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Farchi vepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 March 21
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1003/equinoxp1_orman.jpg (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fimage %2F1003%2Fequinoxp1_orman_big.jpg)
Equinox + 1
Credit & Copyright: Joe Orman (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fjoeorman.shutterace.com%2FGa llery.html) Explanation: Twice a year, at the Spring and Fall equinox (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FVe rnal_equinox), the Sun rises due east. In an emphatic demonstration (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap080 922.html) of this celestial alignment (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap030 320.html), photographer Joe Orman recorded this inspiring image of (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fjoeorman.shutterace.com%2FSu n%2FSun_010321_2.html) the Sun rising exactly along the east-west oriented Western Canal, in Tempe (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FTe mpe%2C_Arizona), Arizona (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FAr izona), USA (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FUn ited_States). But he waited until one day after the northern Spring equinox, in 2001, to photograph the striking view. Why was the rising Sun (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap000 110.html) due east one day after the equinox? At Tempe's latitude (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FLa titude) the Sun rises at an angle (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fsolar.physics.montana.edu%2F YPOP%2FClassroom%2FLessons%2FSundials%2Fequinox.html), arcing southward as it climbs above the horizon. Because the distant mountains hide the true horizon, the Sun shifts (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap051 221.html) slightly southward by the time it clears the mountain tops (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap990 902.html). Waiting 24 hours allowed the Sun to rise just north of east and arc back to an exactly eastern alignment (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv% 3DDSdDeooDQEY) for the photo. Today is another Equinox + 1 day, with the Sun crossing the celestial equator yesterday at about 17:32 Universal Time (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.usno.navy.mil%2FUSNO%2Fa stronomical-applications%2Fastronomical-information-center%2Funiversal-time).

DSdDeooDQEY
(http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap100 322.html)

monza
23-03-2010, 13:31
Discover the cosmos! (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Farchi vepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 March 22
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1003/colddust_planck.jpg (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fimage %2F1003%2Fcolddust_planck_big.jpg)
The Nearby Milky Way in Cold Dust
Credit: ESA (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.esa.int%2F), Planck HFI Consortium (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.rssd.esa.int%2Findex.php %3Fproject%3DPLANCK%26page%3Dhfi_top), IRAS (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Firsa.ipac.caltech.edu%2FIRAS docs%2Firas.html) Explanation: What shapes the remarkable dust tapestry of the nearby Milky Way Galaxy? No one knows for sure. The intricate structures, shown above (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.esa.int%2FesaCP%2FSEMMN9 CKP6G_index_1.html), were resolved in new detail recently in a wide region of the sky imaged in far infrared light by the European Space Agency (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FEu ropean_Space_Agency)'s Planck satellite (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.rssd.esa.int%2Findex.php %3Fproject%3Dplanck). The above image (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.esa.int%2FesaCP%2FSEMMN9 CKP6G_index_0.html) is a digital fusion of three infrared colors: two taken at high resolution by Planck, while the other is an older image (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fadsabs.harvard.edu%2Fabs%2F2 005ApJS..157..302M) taken by the now defunct IRAS satellite (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FIR AS). At these colors, the sky is dominated by the faint glow of very cold gas within only 500 light years (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fchandra.harvard.edu%2Fphoto% 2Fcosmic_distance.html) of Earth. In the above image (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.esa.int%2FesaCP%2FSEMMN9 CKP6G_index_1.html), red corresponds to temperatures as cold as 10 degrees Kelvin (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Flamar.colostate.edu%2F%257Eh illger%2Ftemps.htm) above absolute zero, while white corresponds to gas as warm at 40 Kelvins. The pink band across the lower part of the image is warm gas confined to the plane of our Galaxy (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap090 613.html). The bright regions typically hold dense molecular cloud (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap090 623.html)s that are slowly collapsing to form stars, whereas the dimmer regions are most usually diffuse interstellar gas (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap010 113.html) and dust (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap030 706.html) known as cirrus (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.daviddarling.info%2Fency clopedia%2FI%2Finfrared_cirrus.html). Why these regions have intricate filamentary (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap091 025.html) shapes shared on both large and small scales remains a topic of research. Future study of the origin and evolution of dust may help in the understanding the recent history of our Galaxy (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FGa laxy%23Observation_history) as well as how planetary systems (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv% 3D5l5mB-rFuGo) such as our Solar System came to be (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv% 3DF0yWgyOimEI) born.

5l5mB-rFuGo (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap100 323.html)

F0yWgyOimEI

monza
23-03-2010, 13:37
Discover the cosmos! (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Farchi vepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 March 23
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1003/prominence_friedman.jpg (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fimage %2F1003%2Fprominence_friedman_big.jpg)
Reinvigorated Sun and Prominence
Credit & Copyright: Alan Friedman (Averted Imagination (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.avertedimagination.com%2 Fmain1.htm)) Explanation: Dramatic prominences (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fcsep10.phys.utk.edu%2Fastr16 2%2Flect%2Fsun%2Fprominences.html) can sometimes be seen looming just beyond the edge of the sun. Such was the case last week as a giant prominence, visible above (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.avertedimagination.com%2 Fimg_pages%2Fa_big_one_color031610.html) on the right, highlighted a Sun showing increased activity (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv% 3DE9DyxVXySaA) as it comes off an unusually quiet (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap080 924.html) Solar Minimum (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FSo lar_minimum). A changing carpet of hot gas (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap081 102.html) is visible in the chromosphere (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fsolarscience.msfc.nasa.gov%2 Ffeature2.shtml) of the Sun in the above image (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.avertedimagination.com%2 Fimg_pages%2Fa_big_one_color031610.html) taken in a very specific color (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FHy drogen_Alpha) of light emitted by hydrogen. A solar prominence (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fsolar.physics.montana.edu%2F YPOP%2FProgram%2Fhfilament.html) is a cloud of solar gas held just above the surface by the Sun's magnetic field (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fcsep10.phys.utk.edu%2Fastr16 2%2Flect%2Fsun%2Fmagnetic.html). The Earth (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap070 325.html) would easily fit below the prominence (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap030 223.html) on the right. Although very hot, prominences typically appear dark (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap010 129.html) when viewed against the Sun (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nineplanets.org%2Fsol.ht ml), since they are slightly cooler than the surface. A quiescent prominence (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap970 127.html) typically lasts about a month, and may erupt (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv% 3DVeQiLZCl7p8) in a Coronal Mass Ejection (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fsolarscience.msfc.nasa.gov%2 FCMEs.shtml) (CME) expelling hot gas into the Solar System (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fcsep10.phys.utk.edu%2Fastr16 1%2Flect%2Fsolarsys%2Fscale.html). The next day, the same prominence looked (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.avertedimagination.com%2 Fimg_pages%2Fmonster_031710.html) slightly different.

E9DyxVXySaA

VeQiLZCl7p8

RIDER
23-03-2010, 19:21
Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 March 23
http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1003/prominence_friedman.jpg (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1003/prominence_friedman_big.jpg)
Reinvigorated Sun and Prominence
Credit & Copyright: Alan Friedman (%20alan%20at%20greatarrow%20dot%20com) (Averted Imagination (http://www.avertedimagination.com/main1.htm)) Explanation: Dramatic prominences (http://csep10.phys.utk.edu/astr162/lect/sun/prominences.html) can sometimes be seen looming just beyond the edge of the sun. Such was the case last week as a giant prominence, visible above (http://www.avertedimagination.com/img_pages/a_big_one_color031610.html) on the right, highlighted a Sun showing increased activity as it comes off an unusually quiet (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap080924.html) Solar Minimum (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_minimum). A changing carpet of hot gas (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap081102.html) is visible in the chromosphere (http://solarscience.msfc.nasa.gov/feature2.shtml) of the Sun in the above image (http://www.avertedimagination.com/img_pages/a_big_one_color031610.html) taken in a very specific color (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrogen_Alpha) of light emitted by hydrogen. A solar prominence (http://solar.physics.montana.edu/YPOP/Program/hfilament.html) is a cloud of solar gas held just above the surface by the Sun's magnetic field (http://csep10.phys.utk.edu/astr162/lect/sun/magnetic.html). The Earth (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap070325.html) would easily fit below the prominence (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap030223.html) on the right. Although very hot, prominences typically appear dark (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap010129.html) when viewed against the Sun (http://www.nineplanets.org/sol.html), since they are slightly cooler than the surface. A quiescent prominence (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap970127.html) typically lasts about a month, and may erupt in a Coronal Mass Ejection (http://solarscience.msfc.nasa.gov/CMEs.shtml) (CME) expelling hot gas into the Solar System (http://csep10.phys.utk.edu/astr161/lect/solarsys/scale.html). The next day, the same prominence looked (http://www.avertedimagination.com/img_pages/monster_031710.html) slightly different.

Tomorrow's picture: galaxy wars

monza
28-03-2010, 02:23
Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 March 23
http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1003/prominence_friedman.jpg (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1003/prominence_friedman_big.jpg)
Reinvigorated Sun and Prominence
Credit & Copyright: Alan Friedman (%20alan%20at%20greatarrow%20dot%20com) (Averted Imagination (http://www.avertedimagination.com/main1.htm)) Explanation: Dramatic prominences (http://csep10.phys.utk.edu/astr162/lect/sun/prominences.html) can sometimes be seen looming just beyond the edge of the sun. Such was the case last week as a giant prominence, visible above (http://www.avertedimagination.com/img_pages/a_big_one_color031610.html) on the right, highlighted a Sun showing increased activity (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E9DyxVXySaA) as it comes off an unusually quiet (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap080924.html) Solar Minimum (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_minimum). A changing carpet of hot gas (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap081102.html) is visible in the chromosphere (http://solarscience.msfc.nasa.gov/feature2.shtml) of the Sun in the above image (http://www.avertedimagination.com/img_pages/a_big_one_color031610.html) taken in a very specific color (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrogen_Alpha) of light emitted by hydrogen. A solar prominence (http://solar.physics.montana.edu/YPOP/Program/hfilament.html) is a cloud of solar gas held just above the surface by the Sun's magnetic field (http://csep10.phys.utk.edu/astr162/lect/sun/magnetic.html). The Earth (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap070325.html) would easily fit below the prominence (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap030223.html) on the right. Although very hot, prominences typically appear dark (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap010129.html) when viewed against the Sun (http://www.nineplanets.org/sol.html), since they are slightly cooler than the surface. A quiescent prominence (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap970127.html) typically lasts about a month, and may erupt (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VeQiLZCl7p8) in a Coronal Mass Ejection (http://solarscience.msfc.nasa.gov/CMEs.shtml) (CME) expelling hot gas into the Solar System (http://csep10.phys.utk.edu/astr161/lect/solarsys/scale.html). The next day, the same prominence looked (http://www.avertedimagination.com/img_pages/monster_031710.html) slightly different.

Tomorrow's picture: galaxy wars





Exactly alike!
http://www.sat-universe.com/showpost.php?p=574395&postcount=396

monza
28-03-2010, 02:27
Discover the cosmos! (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Farchi vepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 March 24
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1003/m81m82_orazi.jpg (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fimage %2F1003%2Fm81m82_orazi_big.png)
Galaxy Wars: M81 versus M82
Credit & Copyright: Leonardo Orazi (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.starkeeper.it%2FAbout.ht m) Explanation: On the right, surrounded by blue spiral arms, is spiral galaxy M81 (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap060 707.html). On the left, marked by red gas and dust clouds, is irregular galaxy M82 (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap060 425.html). This stunning vista (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.starkeeper.it%2FM81M82.h tm) shows these two mammoth galaxies locked in gravitational combat (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fcsep10.phys.utk.edu%2Fastr16 2%2Flect%2Fgalaxies%2Fcolliding.html), as they have been for the past billion years. The gravity from each galaxy dramatically affects (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.cita.utoronto.ca%2F%257E dubinski%2Fmerger%2Fbigmerger.html) the other during each hundred million-year pass. Last go-round, M82 (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap060 414.html)'s gravity likely raised density waves rippling around M81 (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FMe ssier_81), resulting in the richness of M81 (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv% 3DYpLIY4CPiTI)'s spiral arms. But M81 left M82 (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.seds.org%2Fmessier%2Fm%2 Fm082.html) with violent star forming regions and colliding gas clouds so energetic the galaxy glows in X-rays (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fchandra.harvard.edu%2Fphoto% 2F2000%2F0094%2Findex.html). In a few billion years only one galaxy will remain (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap041 121.html).

YpLIY4CPiTI
(http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap100 325.html)

monza
28-03-2010, 02:29
Discover the cosmos! (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Farchi vepix.html) Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
2010 March 25
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1003/NGC2442HST-GendlerS900.jpg (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fimage %2F1003%2FNGC2442HST-GendlerL.jpg)
NGC 2442: Galaxy in Volans
Image Credit: Data - Hubble Legacy Archive (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fhla.stsci.edu%2F), Processing - Robert Gendler (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.robgendlerastropics.com% 2F) Explanation: Distorted galaxy (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fburro.cwru.edu%2FJavaLab%2FG alCrashWeb%2Fmain.html) NGC 2442 can be found in the southern constellation of the flying fish (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv% 3DlRshhWGKBnw), (Piscis) Volans (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FVo lans). Located about 50 million light-years away, the galaxy's two spiral arms (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fcurious.astro.cornell.edu%2F question.php%3Fnumber%3D199) extending from a pronounced central bar have a hook-like appearance in wide-field images (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap090 228.html). But this mosaicked close-up (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.robgendlerastropics.com% 2FNGC2442HST-Gendler.html), constructed from Hubble Space Telescope data, follows the galaxy's structure in amazing detail. Obscuring dust lanes, young blue star clusters and reddish star forming (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap061 123.html) regions surround a core of yellowish light from an older population of stars. The sharp Hubble data also reveal more distant background galaxies (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.noao.edu%2Foutreach%2Fao p%2Fobservers%2Fbggalaxies.html) seen right through NGC 2442's star clusters and nebulae (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Farxiv.org%2Fabs%2Fastro-ph%2F9701015). The image spans about 75,000 light-years at the estimated distance of NGC 2442 (http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.aao.gov.au%2Fimages%2Fca ptions%2Faat098.html).

lRshhWGKBnw
(http://www.sat-universe.com/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapod.nasa.gov%2Fapod%2Fap100 326.html)

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